Procrastinators, you can blame it on genetics…tomorrow

BY Willis Raburu  April 8, 2014 at 4:44 PM EST
Procrastination is more than just laziness. It's a serious problem that affects our health, our relationships and our work. But what controls our willpower? Photo by Robert Daly/Getty Images

Procrastination is more than just laziness. It’s a serious problem that affects our health, our relationships and our work. But what controls our willpower? Photo by Robert Daly/Getty Images

Procrastination is in your genes, according to a study from researchers at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

“Everyone procrastinates at least sometimes,” explains psychological scientist and study author Daniel Gustavson in the journal Psychological Science. “We wanted to explore why some people procrastinate more than others and why procrastinators seem more likely to make rash actions and act without thinking.”

The study found that procrastination and a propensity for impulsivity share considerable genetic similarity.

Scientists surveyed 181 identical-twin pairs and 166 fraternal-twin pairs to understand the relative importance of genetic and environmental influences on particular behaviors, including the ability to set and maintain goals.

Want to know more about procrastination? In February, reporter Rebecca Jacobson explored the science behind the behavior.