#IMHO

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  • essay2
    September 20, 2016  

    When Jennine Capó Crucet was a college freshman, her parents stayed for her entire orientation. It wasn’t because they especially wanted to; they just didn’t know what they were meant to do. As a first-generation college student, Crucet was not aware of the norms understood by most of her peers. Now a novelist and professor, she gives her take on what first-generation students need. Continue reading

  • russell
    August 30, 2016  

    Novelist and poet Russell Banks used to feel guilty about not taking pictures to document his trips. Now, he doesn’t even bring a camera with him, believing that visually recording an experience would effectively remove him from it. In contrast, describing sights in writing imprints images upon his memory. Banks shares an essay on how a camera can distinguish between a traveler and a tourist. Continue reading

  • BERKELEY, CA JAN. 20, 2011 Author Peggy Orenstein, shown at her Berkeley home, has a new book––"Cinderella Ate My Daughter". The acclaimed author of the groundbreaking bestseller Schoolgirls reveals the dark side of pink and pretty in this wake–up call to parents: the rise of the girlie girl is not that innocent. As a new mother, Peggy Orenstein was blindsided by the persistent ultra–feminine messages being sent to a new generation of little girls–from "princess–mania" to endless permutations of pink. How many times can you say no when your daughter begs for a pint–sized wedding gown, she wondered.  (Photo by Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
    August 23, 2016  

    In her new book “Girls & Sex,” Peggy Orenstein suggests that we re-think sexual intimacy, in both education and our everyday lives. While she acknowledges the importance of the national debate on campus sexual assault, Orenstein also urges us to broaden our definition of “sex” and talk candidly about what happens after consent — arguing that if we don’t guide our teenagers, pop culture will. Continue reading

  • Sebastian Junger, the director of the film "Which Way Is The Front Line From Here? The Life and Time of Tim Hetherington", poses for a portrait during the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, January 21, 2013.  REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT MEDIA HEADSHOT) - RTR3CRIG
    July 4, 2016  

    Every Fourth of July, author Sebastian Junger says he thinks about what America means to military servicemen who came as emigrants to the U.S. What motivates them to fight and risk their lives in a country where they might be discriminated against when they’ve returned from duty? Junger considers our ordinary heroes who serve the greater good and not just themselves. Continue reading

  • reading2
    July 1, 2016  

    Make sure you cover up this summer — with sunscreen. But your chick lit, schlocky novels, and frivolous fiction? No way, says writer Jennifer Weiner summer reading in her NewsHour essay. Embrace the F-word this Fourth of July, she says. Not just “freedom” but “fun.” Because there is no shame in making summer reading just that. Continue reading

  • Elementary student takes a math test
    June 22, 2016  

    The United States, Liberia and Myanmar are the only countries in the world that do not
    officially use the metric system for weights and measurements. On the brink of Thursday’s Brexit vote, author Daniel Pink wonders when, if ever, the U.S. might join the rest of the metric world.
    Continue reading

  • Well-wishers leave a shirt at a make-shift memorial on Boylston Street a day after two explosions hit the Boston Marathon in Boston, Massachusetts in this April 16, 2013 file photo. To match Feature BOSTON BOMBINGS-FILM/    REUTERS/Adrees Latif/Files - RTSE5P9
    June 1, 2016  

    With horror stories of extremist violence dominating headlines around the globe, it’s easy to get worked up over the threat, however improbable, of domestic terrorism. National security analyst and mom Juliette Kayyem says there’s no such thing as perfect safety, but there are steps you can take to ensure your family makes it through times of crisis — and it starts with being prepared. Continue reading

  • essay
    May 25, 2016  

    Duke University biologist Sheila Patek has faced criticism from lawmakers over her research into mantis shrimp and trap-jaw ants, with some calling her government-funded studies a waste of taxpayer money. But according to Patek, not only do her findings have important practical applications, but scientific inquiry is most fruitful when knowledge is sought for its own sake, not to justify budgets.
    Continue reading

  • essay
    May 2, 2016  

    Paton Blough has two labels he will have to bear for the rest of his life: “bipolar” and “convicted felon.” Having been arrested during his delusional episodes, Blough uses his experiences to help train police officers in crisis management when dealing with the mentally ill. Continue reading

  • essay2
    April 13, 2016  

    Have you ever had a dish turn out wrong no matter how closely you stick to the recipe?
    According to legendary chef Jacques Pépin, recipes describe a process that can never be duplicated exactly; what you need to understand is the “idea” behind the recipe, and use it as a point of departure. Continue reading

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