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Science students, why did you choose basic research?

BY Bridget Shirvell  February 12, 2014 at 2:22 PM EST
What can a glowing green worm can teach us about our immune systems? Researchers at MIT hope to find out. Photograph by Rebecca Jacobson/NewsHour

What can a glowing green worm can teach us about our immune systems? Researchers at MIT hope to find out. Photograph by Rebecca Jacobson/NewsHour

Long hours in the lab are the foundation of so many discoveries. PBS NewsHour recently launched a new series on basic research that tries to capture the excitement of those discoveries and the reasons why scientists have chosen their fields.

We’ve reported on the search for dark matter and what microscopic worms can teach us about immunity. Now we want to hear from you.

We want to know more about why students engaged in basic research have made that decision. What about it excites you? Frustrates you? Keeps you awake — or makes you want to stay awake — all night? Whether it’s an aspect of your research, your mice, your lab, your teammates, your professors, tell us — and show us — why it matters to you.

Here’s how:

  • Show us in a 6-second Vine video and tag @NewsHour.
  • Share with us in an Instagram video and tag @NewsHour, or send us a direct message with your video.
  • Upload a short video to YouTube (no more than 1:00) and title it “Hey NewsHour, this is why I chose basic research.”

We’ll post the best entries on the PBS NewsHour website. And if your video looks interesting, who knows, we may even come to your lab to visit and write a story about your research.

Deadline is March 14.