Monday, September 26, 2016

  • The musical rumble that makes us love ‘West Side Story’
    On this day nearly six decades ago, “West Side Story” premiered on Broadway. And the music of the Sharks and the Jets, and star-crossed lovers Tony and Maria is as vibrant as it was in 1957. Jeffrey Brown sits down with composer and musician Rob Kapilow to discuss what it is about Leonard Bernstein’s hit musical style that has allowed the love story to live on for decades.
    Original Air Date: September 26, 2016
    1961:  Actors Natalie Wood actor Richard Beymer perform balcony scene in 1961 film "West Side Story" directed by Jerome Robbins and Robert Wise. "West Side Story" won 10 Academy Awards including Best Picture.  Permiered  October 18,  1961 New York City, New York. Los Angeles, California premiere December 13, 1961.  (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
  • South Sudan VP addresses violent clashes, corruption claims
    A recent investigation into corruption among South Sudan’s top leaders alleged that the country’s president, former vice president and military generals have been involved in insider deals. The country’s new vice president, Taban Deng Gai, speaks with Hari Sreenivasan about the investigation, as well as South Sudan’s violent summer, including an attack on U.S. diplomats.
    Original Air Date: September 26, 2016
    South Sudan's Vice President Taban Deng Gai addresses the United Nations General Assembly in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S., September 23, 2016.  REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz - RTSP6HC
  • How the candidates prepared for their first face-off
    Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton will face off for the first time in the election at Hofstra University. The much-anticipated debate comes as the two candidates are neck-to-neck in national polls. Both have been attempting to manage expectations: Clinton calling for the moderator Lester Holt to fact-check and Trump suggesting he will be unfair. John Yang reports.
    Original Air Date: September 26, 2016
    A TV cameraman prepares for the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder - RTSPJ05
  • PBS NewsHour full episode Sept. 26, 2016
    Monday on the NewsHour, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump get ready to meet on the same stage for the first time in this election. We talk to campaign surrogates, plus get debate predictions from our political analysts. Also: South Sudan’s vice president on corruption, remembering golf legend Arnold Palmer and why “West Side Story” has withstood the test of time.
    Original Air Date: September 26, 2016
    Workers on the stage prepare for the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder - RTSPJCK
    FULL PROGRAM
    September 26, 2016
  • News Wrap: Washington mall shooting suspect gives confession
    In our news wrap Monday, Arcan Cetin, the suspect in Saturday’s mall attack in Washington state, made a confession and has been charged with premeditated murder after allegedly gunning down five. Also, a man opened fire at a strip mall in Houston, wounding six, one critically, before he died in a gun battle with the police.
    Original Air Date: September 26, 2016
    Authorities are pictured at the Cascade Mall following reports of an active shooter in Burlington, Washington, U.S. September 23, 2016.  REUTERS/Matt Mills McKnight - RTSP7FF
  • What Clinton and Trump want from the first debate
    As Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton prepare to take the stage for their first debate, we ask their campaigns about their strategies. Gwen Ifill talks to Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook and Judy Woodruff talks to Trump senior advisor Jack Kingston.
    Original Air Date: September 26, 2016
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  • First debate predictions in an unpredictable election year
    Amy Walter of the The Cook Political Report, syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff for some pre-debate analysis. They discuss what each candidate is hoping to accomplish: for Hillary Clinton it is showcasing her opponent’s temperament and judgement, and for Donald Trump it’s speaking about shaking up the status quo.
    Original Air Date: September 26, 2016
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  • Remembering Arnold Palmer, charismatic golf star
    It was a golf career that consisted of 67 victories, seven of which were major championships. From his ferocious swing to his magnetic personality, Arnold Palmer helped turn golf into a major television sport -- and even had a drink named for him. William Brangham remembers the sports legend, who passed away Sunday night at 87, with Golf Channel’s George Savaricas.
    Original Air Date: September 26, 2016
    Honorary starter Arnold Palmer gestures after hitting a drive to begin the 2007 Masters golf tournament on the first tee at the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia, U.S. on April 5, 2007.     REUTERS/Mike Blake/File Photo - RTSPEGP

Sunday, September 25, 2016

  • PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode Sept. 25, 2016
    On this edition for Sunday, Sept. 25, what voters should expect during the first presidential debate on Monday and reaction to the police videos of the shooting death of Keith Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina. Later, learn how one company received a boost to business after its CEO raised the minimum wage for employees to $70,000 a year. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: September 25, 2016
    Marchers rally outside Bank of America stadium during an NFL game to protest the police shooting of Keith Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S. September 25, 2016. REUTERS/Jason Miczek - RTSPDDI
    FULL PROGRAM
    September 25, 2016
  • What to expect from the first presidential debate
    As U.S. presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton prepare for their first debate on Monday night, NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield joins Hari Sreenivasan in New York to discuss what to expect.
    Original Air Date: September 25, 2016
    Hostra University students playing the roles of the candidates and moderator go through a rehearsal for the first U.S. presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York September 25, 2016. Left to right are Joseph Burch, Christian Stewart and Caroline Mullen.  REUTERS/Rick Wilking - RTSPCT5
  • Questions remain after Charlotte police release videos
    The attorney representing the family of Keith Scott says videos released Saturday show he was not acting aggressively when police fatally shot him last week in Charlotte, North Carolina. Police Chief Kerr Putney said he released the videos in the interest of transparency. Carla Shedd, an assistant professor of sociology and African-American studies at Columbia University, joins Hari Sreenivasan.
    Original Air Date: September 25, 2016
    Protesters march during another night of protests over the police shooting of Keith Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S. September 24, 2016.  REUTERS/Mike Blake - RTSPAOC
  • This company raised minimum wage to $70,000 -- and it helped business
    In 2015, Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price announced he would raise the company’s minimum wage to $70,000 a year by 2017and slash his own compensation by more than 90 percent. More than a year later, Price reports the company's revenue and clientele has grown substantially, despite critics' predictions that the move would be bad for business. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent John Larson reports.
    Original Air Date: September 25, 2016
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Saturday, September 24, 2016

  • PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode Sept. 24, 2016
    For this episode on Saturday, Sept. 24, protests continue against police violence in Charlotte, North Carolina. Later, hear about the opening of the new National Museum of African American History and Culture, and how Maryland and North Carolina are trying to redistrict their counties to better represent voters. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: September 24, 2016
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    FULL PROGRAM
    September 24, 2016
  • How do police decide when to release video footage?
    In Charlotte, North Carolina, police announced Saturday they would release body cam and dash cam footage from the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. Dozens of U.S. cities have started equipping their police with body cameras, including Charlotte -- but that footage is not always released to the public. National reporter for the Washington Post Wesley Lowery joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss.
    Original Air Date: September 24, 2016
    Marchers protest the police shooting of Keith Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S., September, 24, 2016. REUTERS/Jason Miczek - RTSPA6K
  • North Carolina and Maryland challenge gerrymandering
    Gerrymandering -- the practice of drawing districts to benefit one political party over another or to protect an incumbent -- has a long history in the U.S. Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield reports on reform efforts in Maryland, where one district has been called a “broken-winged pterodactyl,” and in North Carolina, where litigation is challenging partisan redistricting.
    Original Air Date: September 24, 2016
    An example of gerrymandering in Maryland's 3rd congressional district. Photo by PBS NewsHour Weekend
  • Architect on African American History Museum’s unique exterior
    Architect Philip Freelon talks about how light affects the National Museum of African American History and Culture, which opened on Saturday on the National Mall. While other structures on the Mall are made of marble, granite or concrete, the museum’s unique design means it changes appearance depending on the time of day.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
    The Washington Monument rises behind the National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington September 14, 2016. The museum is holding a media preview today ahead of its opening day on September 24.  REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque - RTSNPZJ

Friday, September 23, 2016

  • Using an ancient Greek tragedy to face trauma in Ferguson​
    In the Greek tragedy “Antigone,” the title character is told that she cannot bury her brother, who has been killed. Echoes of the classical work rang out in 2014, when Michael Brown was shot by police and left dead in the street for hours. New York-based group Outside the Wire presents “Antigone in Ferguson,” a pertinent take on Sophocles that’s encouraging discussion. Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
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  • PBS NewsHour full episode Sept. 23, 2016
    Friday on the NewsHour, a first look at the last moments of Keith Scott, a black man who was killed by police in Charlotte. Also: How President Hillary Clinton would govern from Day 1, a last meeting for Colombia’s largest rebel group, Shields and Brooks on the week’s news, using Greek tragedy to heal deep wounds in Ferguson and Carl Reiner gives his Brief but Spectacular take.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
    A memorial is pictured at the location where the police shooting of Keith Scott took place, in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S., September 23, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake - RTSP6AI
    FULL PROGRAM
    September 23, 2016
  • Shields and Brooks on transparency in police shootings
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s news, including police shootings in Charlotte and Tulsa, the newly released video showing the fatal shooting of Keith Scott, the candidates’ views on police violence and recent protests and what we should expect from the first presidential debate.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
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  • FARC holds final summit as an armed rebel group
    On Monday, Colombia will sign a peace accord, ending more than 50 years of war. The deal, if approved by public referendum, ends the insurgency by the guerilla group known as the FARC, which will begin to transition into a political group. Hari Sreenivasan talks to special correspondent Nadja Drost, who has been witness to the FARC’s final conference all week long.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
    Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) commander Ivan Marquez and members of the leadership attend a news conference at the camp where they prepare to ratify a peace deal with the Colombian government, near El Diamante in Yari Plains, Colombia, September 23, 2016.  REUTERS/John Vizcaino - RTSP66T
  • What President Hillary Clinton would do on Day 1
    With the election just six weeks away, we can begin to imagine what the candidates would actually do if they reach the Oval Office. What would Hillary Clinton propose and get done in the first days of her presidency? Lisa Desjardins and Amie Parnes, co-author of “HRC,” join John Yang to discuss Clinton’s proposals for infrastructure and immigration and her plans for the Supreme Court.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
    REFILE-QUALITY REPEATU.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton reads a piece of paper as she flies back to White Plains, after attending a campaign event in Orlando Florida, U.S. September 21, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria - RTSOVCR
  • News Wrap: Tulsa officer turns herself in to face charges
    In our news wrap Friday, the Tulsa police officer charged with manslaughter in the death of an unarmed black man turned herself in before being released on a $50,000 bond. Also, Sen. Ted Cruz says he will vote for Donald Trump, after not endorsing him at the GOP convention.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
    Tulsa, Oklahoma Police Officer Betty Shelby, 42, charged with first-degree manslaughter in the death of 40-year-old Terence Crutcher, is shown in this Tulsa County Jail booking photo in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S., September 23, 2016.  Courtesy Tulsa County Jail/Handout via REUTERS    ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY - RTSP3ZU
  • Footage of Keith Scott shooting raises more questions
    Cellphone footage of police officers fatally shooting Keith Scott, taken by the victim’s wife, was released Friday. The video comes as Charlotte city officials face mounting pressure to release the police body cam and dash cam videos. Judy Woodruff talks to The New York Times’ Yamiche Alcindor for more.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
    Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts answers questions next to Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney during a news conference regarding the police shooting of Keith Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S., September 23, 2016.     REUTERS/Mike Blake - RTSP5H0
  • Carl Reiner on being a comedian and Mel Brooks’ best friend
    Carl Reiner never thought about going into comedy growing up. That was until he met Mel Brooks. A friendship that started in 1961 with The “2,000-Year-Old Man” skit, the two close friends now have a nightly movie date. Reiner gives his Brief but Spectacular take on his comedic career.
    Original Air Date: September 23, 2016
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Thursday, September 22, 2016

  • PBS NewsHour full episode Sept. 22, 2016
    Thursday on the NewsHour, the city of Charlotte waits to see what will happen next in the investigation of a police shooting. Also: Diminishing hopes for Syria’s cease-fire, what Donald Trump would do on Day 1 of his presidency, examining a disconnect for the black community, the political stakes for the Affordable Care Act, and how marketers manipulate customers into making financial decisions.
    Original Air Date: September 22, 2016
    Two women embrace while looking at a police officer in uptown Charlotte, NC during a protest of the police shooting of Keith Scott, in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S. September 21, 2016. REUTERS/Jason Miczek     TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY      - RTSOVKX
    FULL PROGRAM
    September 22, 2016
  • The fate of ACA hinges on who wins in November
    One big issue at stake in this election is President Obama’s signature domestic achievement: the Affordable Care Act. While Hillary Clinton wants to preserve and expand the law, Donald Trump would replace it with smaller measures to lower costs. From Arizona, special correspondent Sarah Varney speaks with residents about what they would like to see in future health care policy.
    Original Air Date: September 22, 2016
    The federal government forms for applying for health coverage are seen at a rally held by supporters of the Affordable Care Act, widely referred to as "Obamacare", outside the Jackson-Hinds Comprehensive Health Center in Jackson, Mississippi, U.S. on October 4, 2013.  REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman/File Photo - RTSO349
  • The psychological trick behind getting people to say yes
    Asking for someone’s phone number in front of a flower shop will be more successful because the flowers prime us to think about romance. Small, subliminal cues change our willingness to be sold on a product, on ideas or even a date. Economics correspondent Paul Solman speaks with psychology professor Robert Cialdini about his book, “Pre-Suasion,” the crucial step before persuasion.
    Original Air Date: September 22, 2016
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  • Soldiers stand in Charlotte’s streets amid police protests
    Charlotte, North Carolina, has been reeling from the shooting death of Keith Scott by police. The governor called a state of emergency after a peaceful protest turned violent. A black protester was critically wounded, for which many are blaming the police. Judy Woodruff talks to Trevor Fuller of the Mecklenburg Board of County Commissioners.
    Original Air Date: September 22, 2016
    Two people sit on the ground as they protest in front of police in uptown Charlotte, NC  during a protest of the police shooting of Keith Scott, in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S. September 21, 2016. REUTERS/Jason Miczek - RTSOVKP
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