Tuesday, June 2, 2015

  • PBS NewsHour full episode June 2, 2015
    Tuesday on the NewsHour, FIFA president Sepp Blatter announced his resignation amid corruption investigations. Also: Questions about car safety after massive airbag recalls, honoring the valor and service of overlooked WWI veterans, the FBI’s secret surveillance planes, empowering the homeless with new media skills and educating Pakistani children in failing schools.
    Original Air Date: June 2, 2015
    FIFA President Sepp Blatter resigned as FIFA president on Tuesday, four days after being re-elected to a fifth term. Blatter, 79, announced the decision at a news conference in Zurich, six days after the FBI raided a hotel in the city and arrested several FIFA officials. Photo by Ruben Sprich
  • Experimental Karachi school teaches students to aim high
    In one of Karachi's toughest neighborhoods, where the reality of violence and terrorism looms, the Kiran School encourages disadvantaged children to dream big. The goal: prepare them to attend top schools alongside children from the upper class, despite the huge odds stacked against them. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Pakistan.
    Original Air Date: June 2, 2015
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  • How the FBI is using a ‘small air force’ to track suspects
    According to the Associated Press, the FBI operates a fleet of undercover planes equipped with video cameras, some of which can also gather cell phone data. The FBI says these flights target suspected criminals, and that a warrant is not necessary in most cases. Gwen Ifill learns more from AP reporter Jack Gillum.
    Original Air Date: June 2, 2015
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  • Street Sense gives homeless creative tools to build careers
    Street Sense publishes the only newspaper by and for the homeless in Washington, D.C. The organization has long trained participants in journalism and writing, and now it's expanding to offer more education in the arts and digital media, like photography and filmmaking, in hopes of giving people a toehold in new creative careers. The NewsHour’s Anne Davenport reports.
    Original Air Date: June 2, 2015
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  • My airbag is being recalled, now what?
    The largest auto recall in U.S. history has affected 11 major auto companies, 34 million vehicles and dozens of models. It could take the manufacturer Takata two years to make all the replacements. So what’s an owner of one of these vehicles to do? Gwen Ifill talks to David Shepardson of The Detroit News to get insight on Takata’s plan to serve this massive recall.
    Original Air Date: June 2, 2015
    U.S. Representative Jan Schakowsky (D-IL) holds a defective air bag and shrapnel from its deployment during her opening remarks at a hearing of a House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on the Takata airbag recall, on Capitol Hill in Washington June 2, 2015. Also pictured is subcommittee chairman Representative Michael Burgess (R-TX) (L). REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst - RTR4YJPQ
  • Two WWI soldiers receive Medal of Honor posthumously
    President Barack Obama posthumously bestowed the Medal of Honor on two World War I veterans whose heroic acts nearly 100 years ago went unrecognized in an age of discrimination. Sgt. William Shemin and Pvt. Henry Johnson were recognized with the nation's highest military decoration for saving their comrades on French front lines. William Brangham has the story.
    Original Air Date: June 2, 2015
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  • News Wrap: Senate approves bill reshaping NSA surveillance
    In our news wrap Tuesday, the Senate passed the USA Freedom Act to replace expired provisions of the Patriot Act, including the NSA’s legal authority to collect bulk phone records. The new legislation will impose limits on collection and access to the records. Also, Western and Arab nations met in Paris to pledge new support to Iraq in the fight against the growing Islamic State threat.
    Original Air Date: June 2, 2015
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  • Does the end of Sepp Blatter mean a new era for soccer?
    Sepp Blatter, president of soccer's international governing body FIFA, stunned the world when he announced he would resign, just days after winning a fifth term. Yesterday it was reported that Blatter's top deputy had been linked to wire transfers believed to be bribes related to World Cup bids. Judy Woodruff talks to Declan Hill, author of "The Fix: Soccer and Organized Crime."
    Original Air Date: June 2, 2015
    FIFA President Sepp Blatter leaves after his statement during a news conference at the FIFA headquarters in Zurich, Switzerland, June 2, 2015.  Blatter resigned as FIFA president on Tuesday, four days after being re-elected to a fifth term. Blatter, 79, announced the decision at a news conference in Zurich, six days after the FBI raided a hotel in Zurich and arrested several FIFA officials.     REUTERS/Ruben Sprich TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTR4YJC0
  • Rescue teams race to find Chinese cruise ship survivors
    In our news wrap Tuesday, the Senate passed the USA Freedom Act to replace expired provisions of the Patriot Act, including the NSA’s legal authority to collect bulk phone records. The new legislation will impose limits on collection and access to the records. Also, Western and Arab nations met in Paris to pledge new support to Iraq in the fight against the growing Islamic State threat.
    Original Air Date: June 2, 2015
    An aerial view shows rescue workers searching on the sunken ship at Jianli section of Yangtze River, Hubei province, China, June 2, 2015. Rescuers fought bad weather on Tuesday as they searched for more than 400 people, many of them elderly Chinese tourists, missing after a cruise boat was buffeted by a freak tornado and capsized on the Yangtze River. REUTERS/Stringer CHINA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN CHINA - RTR4YHPC

Monday, June 1, 2015

  • PBS NewsHour full episode June 1, 2015
    Monday on the NewsHour, what’s next for the Patriot Act after the Senate failed to pass an extension of three key provisions? Also: Supreme Court rulings on workplace discrimination and online threats, China’s apparent military expansion in disputed waters, a dramatic voyage for a group of refugees, the week ahead in politics and a look inside Islamic State group recruitment.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2015
    U.S. Senator Rand Paul delivers a speech on the floor of the U.S. Senate, in this still image taken from video, on Capitol Hill in Washington May 31, 2015. The legal authority for U.S. spy agencies' collection of Americans' phone records and other data expired at midnight on Sunday after the U.S. Senate failed to pass legislation extending the powers. Picture taken May 31, 2015. REUTERS/Senate TV/Handout via Reuters ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS - RTR4YC42
  • Will Rand Paul’s surveillance stance pay off with voters?
    Gwen Ifill talks to Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report and Tamara Keith of NPR about the 2016 campaign launches of former Gov. Martin O’Malley and Sen. Lindsey Graham, why Sen. Rand Paul took a stand on the Patriot Act, and remembering Beau Biden, son of Vice President Joe Biden, who died over the weekend at the age of 46.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2015
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  • A harrowing look inside a Rohingya camp
    Thousands of Rohingya Muslims have attempted to flee Myanmar, where they are seen as illegal immigrants, Lucy Watson of Independent Television News reports from Rakhine State, where 140,000 Rohingya are living in camps and yearning to escape.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2015
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  • Author poses as IS recruit to understand world of jihad
    In the new book “In the Skin of a Jihadist,” a journalist goes undercover to understand the mind of a terrorist and his recruitment techniques. The author, whose identity has been hidden to protect her safety, speaks with Hari Sreenivasan in New York.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2015
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  • Justices rule on headscarf case, threatening speech online
    The Supreme Court offered two 8 to 1 decisions today. The justices ruled in favor of a young Muslim woman who was rejected from working at Abercrombie & Fitch because she wears a hijab. The court also overturned the conviction of a man who had posted threatening language against his ex-wife on Facebook. Marcia Coyle of The National Law Journal joins Jeffrey Brown to discuss those cases.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2015
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  • How far should U.S. go in South China Sea territory dispute?
    President Obama and Defense Secretary Ashton Carter have urged China to curb activities in the disputed South China Sea territory. Vietnam and other allies have also been advised to ease off. Should the U.S. do more to tamp down growing tensions? William Brangham talks to Michael Auslin of the American Enterprise Institute and Kenneth G. Lieberthal of the Brookings Institution.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2015
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  • Carter warns China again over South China Sea expansion
    During a visit to Vietnam, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter spoke out about tensions in the South China Sea, where the Chinese have been rapidly building reefs into human-made islands. President Obama said China shouldn’t be “throwing elbows” over its claim. While Beijing denies hostile intent, the Pentagon says surveillance flights have spotted artillery systems. William Brangham reports.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2015
    U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter speaks during a joint news conference with Vietnam's Defence Minister Phung Quang Thanh (not pictured) at the Defence Ministry in Hanoi June 1, 2015.  Carter discussed his call for an end to island-building in the South China Sea during talks on Monday with his Vietnamese counterpart, who told a news conference Vietnam had not been expanding its islands. REUTERS/Hoang Dinh Nam/Pool - RTR4YAF5
  • What happens now that the NSA isn’t logging your calls
    For the first time in nearly 14 years, the National Security Agency is no longer allowed to log every time an American picks up the telephone to call someone. Overnight, three key provisions of the Patriot Act were allowed by the Senate to expire, despite exhortations by the White House. Gwen Ifill talks to Charlie Savage of The New York Times about what happens now.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2015
    Photo by Getty Images.
  • News Wrap: Texas gets respite from extreme storms
    In our news wrap Monday, much of Texas saw clear skies for the first time since deadly storms began Memorial Day weekend, though areas remained flooded. At least 31 deaths are tied to the severe weather. Also, Secretary of State John Kerry was flown to Boston after he broke his leg in France. A State Department spokeswoman said the injury would not affect this month’s Iran nuclear talks.
    Original Air Date: June 1, 2015
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  • Patrick Hicks reads 'The Strangers'
    Watch Patrick Hicks read his poem “The Strangers” from his collection "Adoptable" at the 2015 AWP Conference and Bookfair in Minneapolis.
    Original Air Date: May 11, 2015
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Sunday, May 31, 2015

  • PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode May 31, 2015
    On this edition for Sunday, May 31, with a deadline looming, the Senate resumes the debate over the Patriot Act. Leaders worldwide express sympathy for Vice President Joe Biden and his family after the death of his son Beau. And in our signature segment, the growing business of gender non-conforming fashion. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2015
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  • Clock ticks down to expiration of Patriot Act surveillance
    The Senate is in a rare Sunday session, wrangling over three key surveillance provisions of the Patriot Act set to expire at midnight. PBS NewsHour's Political Director, Lisa Desjardins joins Hari Sreenivasan from Washington with more.
    Original Air Date: May 31, 2015
    Senate Majority Leader McConnell calls Senate to a rare Sunday session to debate Patriot Act in Washington
  • How to hook young people on math and science? Robots!
    In the United States, the number of college students pursuing degrees in math and science fields lags well behind dozens of industrialized countries. The numbers are even smaller for women and people of color. But one program is using robotics as a way to inspire interest young people while they're still in high school. NewsHour Special Correspondent Lynn Sherr reports.
    Original Air Date: May 22, 2015
    (JS) ROBOTICS27-- Angel Cruz, 16, of Lincoln High School works on his team robot during the FIRST Robotics competition at the University of Denver. The high school teams are guided by coaches and professional mentors who volunteer their expertise in accor
  • Clothing for gender non-conforming people evolves
    Diane Sawyer's interview last month with Olympic champion Bruce Jenner, who came out as a transgender woman, reignited a national conversation about the complexities of gender presentation and sexuality. NewsHour's Ivette Feliciano reports on how the explosion of transgender and gender non-conforming people in the mainstream media is impacting clothing options for the LGBTQ community.
    Original Air Date: May 29, 2015
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Saturday, May 30, 2015

  • PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode May 30, 2015
    On this edition for Saturday, May 30, more than 4,000 migrants are rescued in the Mediterranean Sea over a 24-hour period. Later, the economic implications of removing Cuba from the U.S. Terror List. And, in our signature segment, how one economic success story in Mexico might become a model for the whole country. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: May 30, 2015
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  • How will financial relations with Cuba change?
    The State Department on Friday officially lifted its designation of Cuba as a state sponsor of terrorism, in one of the many recent steps by the Obama administration to reestablish diplomatic ties between Cuba and the U.S. Carla Robbins of the Council on Foreign Relations joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the implications.
    Original Air Date: May 30, 2015
    The Cuban flag flies in front of the U.S. Interests Section (background), in Havana
  • What does ISIS control mean for the people of Palmyra?
    On Saturday, ISIS continued to maintain control of the city of Palmyra in Syria. For more on how the militant group is treating the people in Palmyra, Anne Barnard of the New York Times joins Hari Sreenivasan via Skype from Istanbul.
    Original Air Date: May 30, 2015
    Columns are pictured in the historical city of Palmyra
  • Boomtowns spur economic growth in Mexico
    NewsHour Weekend explores the boomtowns at the center of the burgeoning economy of Mexico, which has become the third largest trading partner with the United States. But with more than half of its 120 million people living in poverty, Mexico faces an uphill battle to true prosperity.
    Original Air Date: May 29, 2015
    Mexico's stock exchange building is seen in Mexico City

Friday, May 29, 2015

  • PBS NewsHour full episode May 29, 2015
    Friday on the NewsHour, Texans wade through another day of crippling floods with more rain on the horizon. Also: Sepp Blatter wins a fifth term as FIFA president, new EPA regulations for America’s waterways, an inauguration in Nigeria and a U.S. commitment to fight Boko Haram, the significance of scientific research being retracted and Shields and Brooks on the week’s news.
    Original Air Date: May 29, 2015
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