Tuesday, March 21, 2017

  • PBS NewsHour full episode March 21, 2017
    Tuesday on the NewsHour, Supreme Court pick Neil Gorsuch gets grilled by Senate Democrats during his confirmation hearing. Also: President Trump lobbies Republicans to vote for the revised health care replacement, new rules for passengers on flights from 10 foreign cities, parents in a poor neighborhood get more from their preschool and the Whitney Biennial offers art amid major national divides.
    Original Air Date: March 21, 2017
    FULL PROGRAM
    March 21, 2017
  • Art of the Whitney Biennial offers signs of the times
    The Whitney Biennial is a snapshot of American creativity and sometimes a reflection of our culture. What moods and themes did curators find when putting together the exhibition of contemporary art? Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: March 21, 2017
  • Inclusive wellness center is a neighborhood oasis
    In the heart of one of Denver's poorest neighborhoods, parents had hoped a new preschool would be built in. Instead they got much more. The Dahlia Campus for Health and Well-being is a preschool, urban farm, dental office and mental health care center, all in one. William Brangham visits to see how it’s supporting the community.
    Original Air Date: March 21, 2017
  • Did senators get enough substance on Gorsuch’s views?
    It was an all-day interrogation for Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch, who fended off Democratic efforts to ferret out his views on hot-button issues. Judy Woodruff takes a close look at the day’s proceedings with Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal, Amy Howe of Scotusblog.com, Ilya Shapiro of the Cato Institute and Pam Karlan of Stanford Law School.
    Original Air Date: March 21, 2017
    Supreme Court nominee judge Neil Gorsuch testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing Mar. 21 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Photo by REUTERS/Joshua Roberts.
  • What sparked a new carry-on electronics ban on some flights?
    Passengers flying out of 10 specific airports in the Middle East can no longer take large electronic devices in their carry-on luggage, according to a new rule from the Department of Homeland Security. The British announced a similar rule, but included different airports. William Brangham gets insight from Matthew Olsen, former director of the National Counterterrorism Center.
    Original Air Date: March 21, 2017
  • News Wrap: Trump administration reviewing nuclear policy
    In our news wrap Tuesday, a senior official with the president's National Security Council said the White House is evaluating whether the longstanding U.S. goal of a world without nuclear weapons remains "realistic." Also, Northern Ireland marked the death of Martin McGuinness, the one-time commander of the Irish Republican Army who ultimately made peace.
    Original Air Date: March 21, 2017
  • How Trump is trying to sell the Republican health care bill
    Time is ticking before a crucial House vote on the bill to replace the Affordable Care Act. President Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan are trying to close the deal, pushing for votes and privately telling members their jobs are at risk if they don't pass a repeal bill. Their efforts come after pages of policy amendments were added in order to woo key groups. Lisa Desjardins joins Judy Woodruff.
    Original Air Date: March 21, 2017

Monday, March 20, 2017

  • PBS NewsHour full episode March 20, 2017
    Monday on the NewsHour, a House committee delves into a possible Russian government role in the campaign that elected Donald Trump. Meanwhile, a Senate panel begins hearings on the man chosen by President Trump to serve on the Supreme Court. Also: A new art exhibit explores contemporary life in the American West, as seen through the eyes of Latino artists.
    Original Air Date: March 20, 2017
    FULL PROGRAM
    March 20, 2017
  • Schiff: 'Big problem' if Trump is making up wiretap claim
    While Democrats and Republicans pursued sharply different lines of questioning in a House Intelligence hearing Monday, ranking Democrat Rep. Adam Schiff focused in on contacts between Trump campaign advisors and Russian officials. Judy Woodruff talks with Schiff about his main takeaways from the hearing, as well as the credibility of President Trump and the intelligence community.
    Original Air Date: March 20, 2017
  • Artists illuminate Latino life in the American West
    Thirteen young Mexican-American artists explore the ideas of "home" and "place" in the American West in an exhibit called "Mi Tierra" at the Denver Art Museum. Artists tackled topics of immigration, identity struggle and colliding worlds. Jeffrey Brown reports.
    Original Air Date: March 20, 2017
  • Comey confirms Russia probe, but not Trump wiretap claim
    FBI Director James Comey offered a rare admission in a hearing before the House Intelligence Committee, confirming an ongoing investigation into Russian interference during the 2016 election and any potential coordination with the Trump campaign. Comey also said there is no substantial evidence former President Obama ordered a wiretap against President Trump. Lisa Desjardins reports.
    Original Air Date: March 20, 2017
  • Gorsuch promises to be independent from politics
    On day one of Judge Neil Gorsuch's confirmation hearing, senators outlined partisan attacks for the week to come. While Republicans spent most of the hearing praising Gorsuch's legal resume, Democrats knocked his constitutional philosophy as too rigid. Judy Woodruff reports.
    Original Air Date: March 20, 2017
  • Grassley: Gorsuch willing to be a judge, not a legislator
    What did the country learn about Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch on opening day of his confirmation hearings? Judy Woodruff speaks with Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, about Gorsuch’s judicial philosophy, how he compares to the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, plus the House hearing on the FBI’s investigations into Russian influence of the 2016 election.
    Original Air Date: March 20, 2017
  • What to expect from Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation hearings
    Who is Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch, and what does his career on the bench suggest about his beliefs? Jeffrey Brown looks back to offer a portrait of the judge, then Judy Woodruff examines his record with Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal, Tom Goldstein, founder of Scotusblog.com, former U.S. Solicitor General Paul Clement and Pam Karlan of Stanford Law School.
    Original Air Date: March 20, 2017
  • News Wrap: Deadly suicide car bomb explodes in Baghdad
    in our news wrap Monday, at least 23 people were killed and nearly 50 more wounded by a suicide car bomb in a busy commercial district -- and mostly Shiite neighborhood -- of Baghdad. The violence erupted as Iraq's prime minister was visiting the White House. Also: Syrian government forces recaptured part of the capital city Damascus a day after a surprise rebel incursion.
    Original Air Date: March 20, 2017

Sunday, March 19, 2017

  • PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 19, 2017
    On this edition for Sunday, March 19, South Korea helps decrease food waste with new policies, and what to expect from the Gorsuch confirmation hearings. Later, remembering rock ‘n’ roll legend Chuck Berry. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: March 19, 2017
    Rock and roll legend Chuck Berry performs during a concert in Burgos, northern Spain, November 25, 2007 REUTERS/Felix Ordonez - RTX421K
  • Gorsuch confirmation hearings set to begin
    The Senate confirmation hearings for President Donald Trump's first Supreme Court nominee, Judge Neil Gorsuch, begin Monday. But will Democrats attempt to filibuster the nominee a year after Republicans blocked former President Barack Obama’s selection for the court? NewsHour Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield joins Hari Sreenivasan for a look ahead.
    Original Air Date: March 19, 2017
    President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch arrives to meet with Senator Al Franken (D-MN) at his office on Capitol Hill in Washington March 7, 2017.  REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein - RTS11VLO
  • How Chuck Berry defined a generation of rock ‘n’ roll
    Chuck Berry, the legendary musician who helped define rock ’n’ roll, died on Saturday at the age of 90. Music historian Alan Light joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss Berry’s life and his influence on music.
    Original Air Date: March 19, 2017
    Rock and roll legend Chuck Berry poses for photographers during a concert in Burgos, northern Spain, November 25, 2007. Berry died at the age of 90 on Saturday. Photo By Felix Ordonez/Reuters
  • These policies helped South Korea decrease food waste
    About one-third of all the food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted, according to the United Nations. But several years ago, South Korea instituted a law that requires residents to separate food waste from other garbage and imposes fines on anyone who does not recycle. The NewsHour Weekend’s Mori Rothman reports.
    Original Air Date: March 19, 2017
    seoul food waste

Saturday, March 18, 2017

  • PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 18, 2017
    On this edition for Saturday, March 18, a gunman tries to shoot travelers at a busy airport in France, the U.S. and China discuss working together on policy toward North Korea, and the documentary "Newtown" shows how a town struck by one of the country's worst mass shootings has come to embody resilience. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: March 18, 2017
  • As Syrian civil war stretches on, U.S. sends more troops
    On Saturday, opposition fighters began to evacuate the last rebel-held neighborhood of Homs, Syria, where the uprising against President Bashar al-Assad began. As the Syrian civil war enters its seventh year, President Donald Trump’s administration said the U.S. would deploy 400 more troops to the region. Doug Ollivant, a fellow at the New American Foundation, joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss.
    Original Air Date: March 18, 2017
  • Documentary 'Newtown' examines a town’s lasting trauma
    The documentary "Newtown" explores the aftermath of the 2012 mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, where a gunman killed 20 children and six adults. The documentary, which weaves together the experiences of those affected by the tragedy, will premiere April 3 on the PBS program Independent Lens. NewsHour Weekend's Saskia de Melker reports.
    Original Air Date: March 18, 2017

Friday, March 17, 2017

  • PBS NewsHour full episode March 17, 2017
    Friday on the NewsHour, German Chancellor Angela Merkel meets with President Trump, setting the tone for talks on trade, NATO and defense. Also: Secretary of State Tillerson's tough talk on North Korea, doctors speak out against the GOP health care plan, Shields and Brooks analyze the week's news, Neil Gaiman's Norse inspiration and the importance of storytelling.
    Original Air Date: March 17, 2017
    FULL PROGRAM
    March 17, 2017
  • Will Tillerson’s tougher talk get Kim Jong-un to the table?
    In South Korea, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson declared “the policy of strategic patience has ended” and laid out the possibility of a pre-emptive military strike against North Korea. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Kathleen Stephens, former U.S. ambassador to South Korea, about the significance of Tillerson’s words at a time of mounting tensions and uncertainty about leadership in the South.
    Original Air Date: March 17, 2017
  • How powerful stories can change the world for the better
    Stories are weapons, for good or ill, says writer Derek Thompson. Society is bound by the common stories we tell, whether it’s about who we should trust and admire, or who we should fear and look down on. Thompson, author of the recent book “Hit Makers: How Things Become Popular,” offers his humble opinion on the powerful stories we need to be passing on.
    Original Air Date: March 17, 2017
  • First Trump-Merkel meeting reflects different views, styles
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Trump met for the first time Friday, a meeting that might have smoothed relations after a rocky start. Though they exchanged compliments, Mr. Trump pressed Merkel on NATO defense spending as well as trade issues, and the chancellor was asked to comment on the president's combative style. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner reports.
    Original Air Date: March 17, 2017
  • Why a top physicians' group opposes the GOP health care plan
    Although leading Republicans are pushing to pass their Obamacare replacement bill next week, its impact on millions of Americans remains a point of worry. Some prominent interest groups directly involved in health care are expressing opposition to the plan. Jeffrey Brown talks to Dr. Andrew Gurman, president of the American Medical Association, about the group’s concerns.
    Original Air Date: March 17, 2017
  • Shields and Brooks on GOP health care bill pushback
    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s news, including the conundrum for Republicans trying to pass a health care bill to replace the Affordable Care Act in the face of different factions of opposition, the White House budget blueprint offering sweeping cuts, plus the continuing allegation of a Trump Tower wiretap.
    Original Air Date: March 17, 2017
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