Monday, August 14, 2017

  • News Wrap: Mattis issues new warning to North Korea
    In our news wrap Monday, Secretary of Defense James Mattis says the U.S. will “take out” any missile Pyongyang fired toward Guam, adding that a North Korean strike on the U.S. could lead to war. Also, President Trump has asked his trade office to investigate China's alleged theft of American technological and intellectual property.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2017
    Length: 264
  • How should U.S. address white supremacist extremism?
    Hari Sreenivasan takes a deep look at the nation’s divide following Saturday’s deadly incident during a white nationalist rally held in Charlottesville, Virginia, as well as what the Trump administration needs to do with Vanita Gupta of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, and George Selim, a former Department of Homeland Security official.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2017
    Length: 510
  • The shifting history of Confederate monuments
    The backdrop of Saturday's violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, was a plan to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from the city's downtown. What’s the story behind such monuments and why do we continue to struggle with the legacy of the Civil War? Edward Ayers of the University of Richmond joins William Brangham to offer some historical context.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2017
    Length: 353
  • Did North Korea get rocket engines from a Ukrainian factory?
    As tensions intensify between the U.S. and North Korea, a provocative new report suggests the engines for its new missiles come from a factory in Ukraine. Special correspondent Nick Schifrin debates the conclusions of the report with Mike Elleman of the International Institute for Strategic Studies and Melissa Hanham of the Middlebury Institute of International Studies.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2017
    Length: 409
    North Korean leader Kim Jong Un inspects the defence detachment on Jangjae Islet and the Hero Defence Detachment on Mu Islet located in the southernmost part of the waters off the southwest front, in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on May 5, 2017. KCNA/ via REUTERSATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, CONTENT, LOCATION OR DATE OF THIS IMAGE. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. NOT FOR USE BY REUTERS THIRD PARTY DISTRIBUTORS. SOUTH KOREA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SOUTH KOREA. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. - RTS15ACG
  • What Trump didn’t say in his response to Charlottesville
    Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report and Susan Page of USA Today join John Yang to discuss the week’s news, including President Trump’s reluctant response to the deadly incident white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, plus a new campaign ad for the president and how his base of support is faring and more.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2017
    Length: 486
  • A surfing contest where everyone doggie paddles
    In our NewsHour Shares moment of the day, four-legged waveriders take part in a unique surf competition. Special correspondent Laura Klivans of KQED reports.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2017
    Length: 127
  • France’s ‘mini Pompeii,’ a Roman town frozen in time by fire
    There’s an archaeological race against time underway in France as archaeologists work to save artifacts from a site dubbed as a “mini Pompeii.” This discovery of these 2,000-year-old Roman ruins is being called perhaps the most important of its kind in the past 50 years. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports.
    Original Air Date: August 14, 2017
    Length: 0

Sunday, August 13, 2017

  • PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode Aug. 13, 2017
    On this edition for Sunday, August 13, locals continue to grapple with the aftermath of a white nationalist rally that has been linked to three deaths. Later, looking at the terror threat posed to the U.S. by white supremacists and other right-wing extremists. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2017
    Length: 1340
    charlottesville_2
  • Post-election spike in hate crimes persists in 2017
    The Charlottesville white nationalist rally, along with the associated deaths and injuries linked to it, follow a nationwide increase in hate crimes in the past year. Within 10 days of Donald Trump’s election, the Southern Poverty Law Center tracked 900 bias-related incidents against minorities. The center’s president Richard Cohen joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss these trends.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2017
    Length: 236
    Community members take part in a protest to demand stop hate crime during the funeral service of Imam Maulama Akonjee, and Thara Uddin in the Queens borough of New York City, Aug. 15, 2016. Photo by Eduardo Munoz/Reuters
  • Charlottesville mayor blames Trump for violent weekend
    As locals grappled with the aftermath of a white nationalist rally that left three people dead on Saturday, Mayor Michael Signer wasted no words on denouncing President Donald Trump for what he says is his culpability in the violence. But a white nationalist leader told The NewsHour’s P.J. Tobia that the radical left is at fault.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2017
    Length: 163
    charlottesville_1
  • White nationalism in U.S. echoes through history
    In an opinion piece in The New York Times on Sunday after a violent weekend, Georgetown University sociology professor Michael Eric Dyson wrote, “We cannot pretend that the ugly bigotry unleashed in the streets of Charlottesville, Va., this weekend has nothing to do with the election of Donald Trump." Dyson joins Hari Sreenivasan for a discussion about racial rhetoric and its history.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2017
    Length: 227
    People struggle with a Confederate flag as a crowd of white nationalists are met by a group of counter-protesters in Charlottesville
  • Local gives history of civil rights in Charlottesville
    Rallies on Friday and Saturday in Charlottesville, Virginia that were reminiscent of Ku Klux Klan gatherings shook people who have for generations fought for civil rights in Virginia and across the country. Activist, writer and educator Leontyne Peck with the University of Virginia’s President’s Commission on Slavery unpacks the weekend’s events with Hari Sreenivasan.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2017
    Length: 242
    White nationalists carry torches on the grounds of the University of Virginia, on the eve of a planned Unite The Right rally in Charlottesville
  • U.S. sees 300 violent attacks inspired by far right a year
    Despite the nation’s focus on Islamic terrorism since 9/11, homegrown, right-wing extremists have also killed dozens of Americans. Peter Bergen, the director of the National Security Studies program for New America, joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the toll of homegrown terrorism in light of the Charlottesville white nationalist rally car attack.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2017
    Length: 278
    Patricia Bailey prays at a makeshift memorial outside the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston
  • Charleena Lyles’ family takes legal action against Seattle
    The estate of Charleena Lyles -- a black woman fatally shot by two white police officers in Seattle in June -- has taken the first step in a wrongful death lawsuit against the city. The claim filed Friday alleges police were negligent and violated her civil rights when the officers fatally shot Lyles, a 30-year-old pregnant mother of four, in her own apartment.
    Original Air Date: August 13, 2017
    Length: 59
    Philly March for Police Abolition

Saturday, August 12, 2017

  • PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode Aug. 12, 2017
    On this edition for Saturday, August 12, North Korea threatens Guam during a week of rising rhetoric, and Sen. John McCain proposes another U.S. strategy for Afghanistan. Later, white nationalists clashed with counter-protesters and police in Charlottesville, Va. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2017
    Length: 1339
    A crowd of white nationalists are met by a group of counter-protesters in Charlottesville
  • White nationalist rally brings clashes in Charlottesville
    Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe declared a state of emergency in Charlottesville on Saturday as hundreds of white nationalists and alt-right activists clashed with police and counter-protesters. It was the second rally to protest the city’s plan to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from Emancipation Park. The NewsHour’s P.J. Tobia joins Hari Sreenivasan from Charlottesville.
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2017
    Length: 294
    A man hits the pavement during a clash between members of white nationalist protesters against a group of counter-protesters in Charlottesville
  • Criticizing Trump, McCain proposes new Afghanistan strategy
    This week, Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain offered a new strategy for the conflict in Afghanistan. McCain called for adding to the approximately 8,400 troops deployed in Afghanistan and giving U.S. commanders greater authority. Aaron O'Connell, an associate professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin, joins Hari Sreenivasan.
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2017
    Length: 319
    U.S. troops assess the damage to an armoured vehicle of NATO-led military coalition after a suicide attack in Kandahar province
  • Guam on alert after North Korean threats
    Amid escalating rhetoric this week between President Donald Trump and North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, North Korea threatened to fire ballistic missiles toward Guam, a small Pacific island that has been a U.S. territory since 1898. Guam is about 2,100 miles southeast of North Korea and home to more than 160,000 people. Wall Street Journal reporter Lucy Craymer joins Hari Sreenivasan from Guam.
    Original Air Date: August 12, 2017
    Length: 228
    A view of posh hotels in the Tumon tourist district on the island of Guam

Friday, August 11, 2017

  • Your favorite book from childhood might be racist
    Do you have an old children’s book you love? Well, there’s a good chance that it might be racist, says kids’ author Grace Lin. She offers her humble opinion on how you can keep loving your favorite classics while acknowledging the out-of-date or harmful parts.
    Original Air Date: August 11, 2017
    Length: 214
  • News Wrap: Kenyan president wins second term
    In our news wrap Friday, Kenya’s election commission says President Uhuru Kenyatta has won a second term. It’s a victory that followed days of protests from backers of opposition leader Raila Odinga, who had claimed the vote was rigged. Also, at least 43 people are dead after two passenger trains collided in Egypt.
    Original Air Date: August 11, 2017
    Length: 213
  • What's the view of U.S. tensions from Pyongyang?
    President Trump denounced North Korea yet again Friday, affirming the U.S. and its military are ready to deal with any further provocation from Pyongyang. Despite the tensions, it was revealed that U.S. and North Korean diplomats have had back channel discussions recently. Nick Schifrin looks at the internal response and gets the North Korean perspective from Rafael Wober of Associated Press.
    Original Air Date: August 11, 2017
    Length: 392
  • How likely is a military conflict with North Korea?
    President Trump said the U.S. and its military is ready to deal with any provocation by the Pyongyang regime. How do the president’s words impact the Trump administration’s options? Judy Woodruff speaks with retired Adm. Dennis Blair, a former U.S. Pacific Forces commander, and former CIA analyst Sue Mi Terry to get some insight into the reclusive regime and how the U.S. should proceed.
    Original Air Date: August 11, 2017
    Length: 415
    U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to reporters after a security briefing at his golf estate in Bedminster, New Jersey U.S. August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst - RTS1B9K0
  • This Baltimore school helps girls step up for college
    "Step," a new documentary, follows students from the Baltimore Leadership School for Girls, an institution with the primary goal of 100 percent college acceptance. But that's not their only success. Girls at the school channel their strengths into practicing step, an artform that combines movement, percussion and more. Members of the school explain what the program has meant to them.
    Original Air Date: August 11, 2017
    Length: 300
  • Risch: North Korea needs to know what’s on Trump’s mind
    Sen. James Risch, R-Idaho, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss President Trump’s remarks on North Korea and the likelihood -- and potential consequences -- of a military conflict, plus Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell under attack from the White House.
    Original Air Date: August 11, 2017
    Length: 410
  • PBS NewsHour full episode Aug. 11, 2017
    Friday on the NewsHour, President Trump warns North Korea that the U.S. military is ready to strike. What's the Trump administration's plan? Also: Brooks and Marcus on the escalating war of words, an art program helps young women in Baltimore go to college and how parents can respond to racism in classic kids' stories.
    Original Air Date: August 11, 2017
    Length: 3249
    FULL PROGRAM
    August 11, 2017
  • Brooks and Marcus on Trump’s tone for North Korea
    New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Ruth Marcus join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s news, including President Trump's tough words for North Korea over its nuclear threat, as well as his thanking Russian President Vladimir Putin for expelling hundreds of U.S. diplomats, plus his attacking Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.
    Original Air Date: August 11, 2017
    Length: 703

Thursday, August 10, 2017

  • Presidential estate shares stories of its enslaved residents
    Montpelier, President James Madison's bucolic Virginia plantation, is beginning to share a rich and rarely told side of its history by shedding light on the lives of the people who were enslaved there. A new exhibit offers insight on the factors that cemented slavery in the Constitution, and stories told by living descendants. Special correspondent Charlayne Hunter-Gault reports.
    Original Air Date: August 10, 2017
    Length: 521
  • Cardin: Trump’s warning for North Korea isn’t a game plan
    The August recess hasn't stopped members of Congress from weighing in on President Trump's latest warnings to North Korea. Judy Woodruff speaks with Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., about the president’s fiery comments and whether the administration has a well-thought-out strategy, plus how the U.S. should approach diplomacy while turning up the pressure on the nation.
    Original Air Date: August 10, 2017
    Length: 410
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