Thursday, December 22, 2016

  • Why covering Trump is a 'unique challenge' for the press
    During the campaign and after, President-elect Donald Trump voiced his distrust of the media and held the press at arms-length. On Thursday, he announced his communications team, including RNC strategist Sean Spicer as press secretary. Brian Stelter of CNN and Jeff Mason of Reuters join Judy Woodruff to discuss what to expect about press relations once the president-elect takes office.
    Original Air Date: December 22, 2016
  • The debate on DC’s new paid family leave policy
    The District of Columbia just passed one of the leading paid family leave laws in the country: D.C. parents who work in the private sector can now take eight weeks off at up to 90 percent of their pay. But opinions differ on the law’s economic impacts. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports.
    Original Air Date: December 22, 2016
  • Why shopping on Sunday is so controversial in Greece
    Americans take shopping on a Sunday for granted. But Greece, a heavily religious country, has been reluctant to embrace the concept. Now, seven years into a financial crisis, the International Monetary Fund is insisting that the government allow Sunday shopping, in an effort to kickstart the economy. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports.
    Original Air Date: December 22, 2016

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

  • Unveiling the long-hidden story of the Attica prison riot
    In September 1971, Attica Correctional Facility in upstate New York became the site of a bloody uprising that would shock the nation. Over several days, some 1,300 inmates seized parts of the prison, demanding better living conditions. Heather Ann Thompson documents the untold story in her new book, “Blood in the Water,” and joins Jeffrey Brown to discuss the truth about the riot's violent end.
    Original Air Date: December 21, 2016
  • The sacred and the scientific clash on Hawaii’s Mauna Kea
    Over a thousand years ago, Polynesians followed the stars in the Mauna Kea sky on their path to Hawaii. Those stars are now of interest to astronomers, who believe the mountain's summit is the perfect spot to build a giant, cutting-edge telescope. But native Hawaiians view that peak as a sacred space. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien reports for the second in our series about the controversy.
    Original Air Date: December 21, 2016
  • In Liberia, sewing school uniforms with social consciousness
    Chid Liberty grew up in the U.S. as the son of a Liberian diplomat. After working in Silicon Valley, he returned to his family's country of origin with a plan to open a garment factory. When that business was devastated by the Ebola crisis, Liberty launched his next venture: a socially conscious clothing line that funds uniform production for schoolchildren. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports.
    Original Air Date: December 21, 2016
  • How Obama's unique background shaped his outlook on race
    The Atlantic's Ta-Nehisi Coates has criticized President Obama’s policies toward black Americans. Perhaps for that reason, he was invited to discuss such issues with Mr. Obama several times throughout the president's tenure. As part of a collaboration with The Atlantic, Coates speaks with Judy Woodruff about his new book, which considers Mr. Obama’s legacy and rare optimism through a racial lens.
    Original Air Date: December 21, 2016
  • What’s at stake in the fight over NC’s ‘Bathroom Bill’
    In North Carolina, lawmakers met in a special session to debate repealing HB2, the so-called “Bathroom Bill” they passed in March. The controversial law says transgender people must abide by the sex listed on their birth certificate, not their gender identity, when using restrooms in public schools and government buildings. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Jeff Tiberii of WUNC for an update.
    Original Air Date: December 21, 2016

Tuesday, December 20, 2016

  • Investigations reveal startling scope of lead contamination
    On Tuesday, Michigan’s attorney general filed new criminal charges in Flint’s lead contamination case. But Flint is not alone. Reports from both USA Today and Reuters find that lead contamination is widespread, affecting some millions of Americans, usually in rural communities with small water systems. Judy Woodruff speaks with Laura Ungar, the lead reporter on the USA Today investigation.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2016
  • The music is medicine for Bruce Springsteen
    Bruce Springsteen finds a calm, safe place when he’s on stage. In the second part of our special interview with the legendary rock ‘n’ roller, Jeffrey Brown sits down with Springsteen to discuss the books that shaped him, how he’s coped with depression and how Americans can start to heal political divides.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2016
  • Conway: Russian interference claims are ‘pure politics’
    Kellyanne Conway, senior adviser to President-elect Donald Trump, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the conclusion by the U.S. intelligence community that Russia tried to influence the election, the president-elect’s tweets in the wake of violence in Germany and Turkey, relations with the Obamas during the presidential transition and a move by President Obama to prevent offshore drilling.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2016
  • How early education can counteract damaging lead exposure
    There is a well-established link between lead exposure and learning disabilities, but early childhood education has been shown to counteract the effects. In Flint, Michigan, where the youngest residents have been the most vulnerable to lead poisoning, the city has opened a free child care center in an attempt to counteract the harmful effects on developing brains. Hari Sreenivasan reports.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2016
  • Worries about access fuel women’s rush to get contraception
    In the immediate aftermath of the election, concerns about access to birth control have spiked. For many women, there’s a fear that the incoming Trump administration will repeal the Affordable Care Act, and with it, access to free contraception. Lisa Desjardins visits with one couple in Baltimore, who took action to get an IUD before Inauguration Day.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2016
    birth control pills
  • Inside Obama’s final push to transfer Guantanamo detainees
    According to a New York Times report, the Obama administration has notified Congress of its plans to transfer more than a dozen of the 59 prisoners who remain at the Guantanamo Bay detention center before President-elect Trump takes office. Charlie Savage of The New York Times joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss how the president has chipped away at the prison population there.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2016
  • News Wrap: Seven detained in Russian ambassador killing
    In our news wrap Tuesday, Turkish police detained seven people in connection to the assassination of Russia’s ambassador, Andrei Karlov, who was shot dead Tuesday at an art gallery. Also, in Syria, buses evacuated more people from east Aleppo, as the Syrian army warned that it’s about to enter the last rebel enclave.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2016
  • Watch: Bruce Springsteen, our complete interview
    Bruce Springsteen sat down with PBS NewsHour's Jeffrey Brown for a wide-ranging, 40-minute interview about his memoir, his approach to songwriting and how he now reflects back on his early life.
    Original Air Date: December 20, 2016

Monday, December 19, 2016

  • How 2016 put pressure on the Electoral College
    On Monday, the 538 members of the Electoral College met in their respective states to cast votes to confirm Donald Trump as the next president of the United States. But this year, the presidential candidate who won the popular vote by a significant margin did not win the Electoral College, raising old questions about a system that’s usually taken for granted. William Brangham reports.
    Original Air Date: December 19, 2016
  • Why Russian election meddling is a partisan issue
    The Electoral College sealed the election of Donald Trump, despite protests and more on the day of the vote. Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report and NPR’s Tamara Keith join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including the debate over the Electoral College, reports that Russia used cyber hacks to influence the election and Monday’s attacks in Germany and Turkey.
    Original Air Date: December 19, 2016
  • Lynching memorial aims to help U.S. acknowledge its history
    Lynchings -- unlawful executions used to terrorise and subdue black communities into passivity -- are perhaps one of the least discussed legacies of slavery and the Jim Crow South. A new memorial in Montgomery, Alabama, will commemorate victims of these acts of terror. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Bryan Stevenson of the Equal Justice Initiative.
    Original Air Date: December 19, 2016
  • A holiday concert where tuba players don’t take a back seat
    In our NewsHour Shares moment of the day, a Christmas tradition shines a spotlight on an instrument usually relegated to the back of the orchestra: the tuba.
    Original Air Date: December 19, 2016
  • How Bruce Springsteen tackles truth, in song and memoir
    Bruce Springsteen has been an American icon for decades, a working-class rock ‘n’ roll hero whose songs speak to millions of devoted fans. Now he’s telling his own story, looking back at his young, struggling and once little-known self. Springsteen sits down with Jeffrey Brown in a special two-part interview to discuss his new memoir, “Born to Run,” and more.
    Original Air Date: December 19, 2016
  • Watch Bruce Springsteen read from his autobiography
    Singer-songwriter Bruce Springsteen reads a selection from his autobiography "Born to Run."
    Original Air Date: December 19, 2016

Sunday, December 18, 2016

  • Under Trump, White House staff shifts to right
    Since winning the election six weeks ago, Donald Trump has nominated most of his cabinet and picked top White House staff, all significant players in shaping U.S. policy. He’ll also have Republican majorities in both houses of Congress on his side. NewsHour Weekend’s Jeff Greenfield joins Alison Stewart to analyze the balance of power in Washington.
    Original Air Date: December 18, 2016
  • Heroin deaths exceeded gun homicides in 2015
    Last year, more than 30,000 people died from opioid overdoses, which cause almost two-thirds of all overdoses in the U.S., according to data released last week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Those data also show that last year, heroin deaths went up 20 percent, exceeding gun homicides. Tom Frieden, director of the CDC, joins Alison Stewart.
    Original Air Date: December 18, 2016
  • Defectors lift curtain on North Korea’s information blackout
    North Korea’s totalitarian government exercises tight control of all media consumed within its borders to maintain power over nearly 25 million citizens. But some who have escaped the country are waging an information war, smuggling media on USB sticks in hopes of helping North Koreans learn about life outside the country. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Karla Murthy reports.
    Original Air Date: December 18, 2016

Saturday, December 17, 2016

  • In North Carolina, new laws to limit governor’s power
    Last month, incumbent Republican Gov. Pat McCrory lost the governor's race to Democrat Roy Cooper. The election spurred Republican state lawmakers to call a special legislative session and pass laws that limit the power of the incoming governor. Michael Gerhardt, a professor at the University of North Carolina Law School in Chapel Hill, joins Alison Stewart.
    Original Air Date: December 17, 2016
  • As Aleppo lies in ruins, thousands wait to escape
    In Syria, the evacuation of civilians from Aleppo continues as thousands of people wait to leave the besieged city. Once the most populous city in the country, previously rebel-held Aleppo is now largely in ruins after a protracted assault by Syrian government forces. Anne Barnard, a reporter with The New York Times, joins Alison Stewart from Beirut for more.
    Original Air Date: December 17, 2016
  • In Cuba, American tourists increase demand for hotels
    Two years ago, President Barack Obama restored diplomatic relations with Cuba. Since then, Cold War-era travel restrictions that prohibited most Americans from visiting were lifted, leading to a surge of U.S. tourists and a scramble to accommodate them. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Amy Guttman looks at the growing hospitality industry in Cuba.
    Original Air Date: December 17, 2016

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