Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS
Voyage of the Odyssey Voice from the Sea
What is the Voyage of the Odyssey Track the Voyage Interactive Ocean Class from the Sea Patrick Stewart
> Questions & Answers
> Science from the Field
> Ocean History
> Teacher Resources
site map  
The following video and audio reports and observations were filmed by the educators and scientists onboard the Odyssey. Please return for periodic video updates! Download Real Player
July 21, 2002
'Crabs - Putting on a New Suit'
"Beachcombers often mistake the perfectly intact exoskeleton (the moulted shell of a crab) for a dead animal. So next time you see what you think is a dead crab lying on the beach, take a second look. On closer inspection, you may find that it is the entirely empty, clean, but discarded armor of a nearby crab that has recently traded it in for a brand new suit of armor."
Read more >>
Listen to the Odyssey log:
Real Audio -  >28k
June 28, 2002
'Noise Pollution: Part I'
"All whales spend their lives immersed in sound. Having evolved into ocean dwellers 60 million years ago, it was natural that sound would prove more useful than sight for perceiving things at a distance. As a result, some aspects of their ability to analyze sounds developed way beyond our own. Their ability to echolocate is an example. Today, whales and other marine mammals seem to be beginning to display vulnerabilities that are related to hearing-though we still don't fully understand just what is going on."
Read more >>
Listen to the Odyssey log:
Real Audio-  >28k
May 2, 2002
'Sustainable Rock Lobsters'
"In terms of the world's natural marine resources, we are obviously close to, and probably exceeding, the maximum global catch that it is possible to sustain. Stocks are currently in decline along every coastline, yet there are ever more humans to feed. Regardless of what direction you look the future appears grim, although we learned today that there is hope with one well managed fishery in Western Australia."
Read more >>
Listen to the Odyssey log:
Real Audio-  >28k
April 28, 2002
'Aerial Surveys'
"While in Fremantle, we met with Chris Burton, Director of the Western Whale Research Institute here in Australia. Whereas we make most of our observations from a boat, Chris does most of his data collection from an airplane. He flies monthly aerial surveys over south-western Australia in search of the elusive Blue whale."
Read more >>
Listen to the Odyssey log:
Real Audio-  >28k
February 6, 2002
'Diving Through Debris'
"Sadly, marine debris is causing much suffering to seals and sea lions around the world. Today we went to visit our friends at the Royal Melbourne Zoo, in Melbourne, Australian, where we were taken behind the scenes of the fur seal exhibit with one of their keepers, Adrian Howard. Adrian gave us a greater insight into the lives of these amazing marine mammals and the threats they face".
Read more >>
Watch the Odyssey log:
Real Video -  >56k  >200k
January 16, 2002
'The Jenner's of Western Australia'
"Curt and Micheline Jenner head the Australian Centre for Whale Research and are a husband and wife scientific team who have been working off the west Australian coast for thirteen years.The Jenner's spend half of the year with humpback whales off Exmouth in north-western Australia and the other half with the rare and illusive Pygmy Blue Whales of Rottnest Island to the south."
Read more >>
Watch the Odyssey log:
Real Video -  >56k  >200k
Video Interview: Curt & Micheline Jenner
December 17, 2001
'The Evolution of Whales'
"The earliest mammals appeared about 200 million years ago as air-breathing, land-dwelling creatures that were warm blooded, had hair, and nursed their young. About 50 million years ago, the earliest known true whales appeared, having apparently evolved from large, carnivorous land mammals right after the earliest ancestors of the first whales made the first tentative motions to reinvade the sea."
Read more >>
Listen to the Odyssey log:
Real Audio -  >28k   >64k

November 20, 2001
'Box Jellyfish'
"It's reckoned that they are probably and potentially the most deadly animals known to science. In fact, it is the only animal that can kill you in two to three minutes.
Read more >>
Watch the Odyssey log:
Real Video -  >56k  >200k
Video Interview: Dr. Phil Alderslade, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Australia.
August 9, 2001
'How Do Sperm Whales Produce Sound?'
"Sperm whales are highly acoustic animals that emit powerful, regular clicks almost continuously while they are underwater. In large males, up to one third of the entire body length is made up of the huge nose, the world's largest biological sound generator."
Read more >>
View FLASH 5 animation >>
Listen to the Odyssey log:
Real Audio -  >28k   >128k
Audio: Visiting Scientist, Peter Teglberg Madsen & Genevieve Johnson
June 8, 2001
The Dive Cycle of the Sperm Whale
While the whale is at the surface, it recovers for about 10 to 15 minutes after a dive, blowing heavily every 10 to 15 seconds. When the oxygen stores in the blood and muscle tissue are replenished, there is sufficient oxygen to allow the whale to hold its breath for the next 40 to 50 minutes. Sperm whales repeat this cycle with varying intervals, throughout the day and night.
Read more >>
REAL AUDIO
   28k    128k
Audio: Visiting Scientist, Peter Teglberg Madsen & Genevieve Johnson
June 6, 2001
The Diving Physiology of the Sperm Whale
In order to exploit the food sources of deeper waters, whales have to stay submerged at great depth for extended periods of time. Sperm whales are masters of this discipline as they may dive to depths of 2000 meters, holding their breath for an extraordinary, 1.5 hours. So how do they accomplish this?
Read more >>
REAL AUDIO
   28k    128k
Audio: Visiting Scientist, Peter Teglberg Madsen & Genevieve Johnson
May 28, 2001
Shark Finning
In order to exploit the food sources of deeper waters, whales have to stay submerged at great depth for extended periods of time. Sperm whales are masters of this discipline as they may dive to depths of 2000 meters, holding their breath for an extraordinary, 1.5 hours. So how do they accomplish this?
Read more >>
REAL AUDIO
   28k  
Audio: Roge Payne
March 18, 2001
The Acoustic Realm of the Sperm Whale - Part II
One would be hard pressed to encounter a more impressive animal than the adult male sperm whale, by any measure it is a most magnificent animal. The largest predator in the sea, he may reach lengths of over 60 ft (18m), he has nothing to fear and is the undisputed king of his ocean home.
Read more >>
REAL AUDIO
   28k    128k
Audio: Visiting Scientist, Benjamin Kahn
March 15, 2001
The Acoustic Realm of the Sperm Whale - Part I
We have been surveying a relatively unknown area in terms of whale and dolphin species, and have been thrilled to encounter several groups of sperm whales. Some have been in tight clusters of eight to ten animals, others spread out in small groups of three and four, as well as several individuals in loose associations. It has been particularly interesting to collect acoustic recordings, or vocalizations from these diverse groups, differing in compositions of abundance, sex and age.
Read more >>
REAL AUDIO
   28k    128k
Audio: Visiting Scientist, Benjamin Kahn
February 6, 2001
Blacklip Pearl Fishery
Fishing in the sea is comparable to hunting on land, it is easy to overharvest populations of wild animals. As a result, populations of many wild fish and shellfish are rapidly declining, while production of aquaculture is increasing. Aquaculture is the farming of marine and freshwater species in captivity.
Read more >>
REAL VIDEO
   56k    200k
Video: Genevieve & Chris Johnson
December 22, 2000
How We Find and Track Sperm Whales
To find and track sperm whales we use a hydrophone array (two underwater microphones housed in a 30 foot, oil-filled tube and towed behind the ship from a 100 meter-long cable). Alone, this acoustic array gives us very good stereo sound from the sea surrounding the boat. Many sounds, like the clicks of sperm whales can be heard through headphones from distances of 5 or even 10 miles away (distances we have determined through our experience of the past few months).
Read more >>
REAL VIDEO
   56k    200k
Video: Chris Johnson & Roger Payne
December 18, 2000
Gray Reef Sharks
For hundreds of millions of years, sharks have survived virtually unchanged and unscathed, ruling supreme in the world's oceans. Unfortunately the party's now over for these predators. Late maturation and low reproduction rates makes them highly vulnerable to over-exploitation.
Read more >>
REAL VIDEO
   56k    200k
Video: Genevieve & Chris Johnson with Roger Payne
November 15, 2000
A Land Hermit Crab
Sometimes, hermit crabs may pull one another from desirable shells. If a match is uneven, one crab, having been intimidated by another, will voluntarily leave the shell without a fight and go in seach of another, a very dangerous voyage for these highly edible crabs.
Read more >>
REAL VIDEO
Audio: Genevieve Johnson
November 8, 2000
Beaked Whales
Sometimes, hermit crabs may pull one another from desirable shells. If a match is uneven, one crab, having been intimidated by another, will voluntarily leave the shell without a fight and go in seach of another, a very dangerous voyage for these highly edible crabs.
Read more >>
REAL VIDEO
Audio: Genevieve Johnson
October 30, 2000
Manta Rays
Watch an encounter with a Manta Ray or
Read more >>
REAL VIDEO
Video: Genevieve Johnson / Brian Hall
July 13, 2000
Blue Footed Boobies
Learn more about these fascinating and approachable birds.
REAL VIDEO
Video: Chris Johnson
June 19, 2000
Squid - The Prey of Sperm Whales
Squid have the largest eyes of any animal, with the eye of the giant squid exceeding 15cm in diameter, the size of a dinner plate.
REAL VIDEO
Video: Chris Johnson
June 16, 2000
Galapagos Sea Lions
The Galapagos Sea Lion is a smaller, endemic subspecies of the Californian Sea Lion. There are approximately 50,000 individuals, well dispersed around the archipelago. They gather in colonies where they can be seen loafing around in piles on the beach or on rocks. These mammals are highly inquisitive and will often accompany snorkellers.
REAL VIDEO
Video: Chris Johnson
May 6, 2000
The Blowholes of Sperm Whales
The position of the blowhole of a sperm whale is not centered as in other toothed whales. The nostril or blowhole of the sperm whale is positioned on the left hand side of the head as shown above. There is in fact a right nostril which is internal.
REAL VIDEO: 28k - 56k - T1/Cable
Video: Chris Johnson
May 14, 2000
Pilot Whales in the Galapagos
REAL VIDEO: 28K - 56K - T1/Cable
Video: Chris Johnson
April 17, 2000
Hammerhead Sharks
REAL VIDEO: 28K - 56K - T1/Cable
Video: Chris Johnson

 
 
> Home > Voice from the Sea > What is the Voyage? > Track the Voyage > Interactive Ocean > Class from the Sea > Patrick Stewart > Help with Plugins? > Site Map