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Voyage of the Odyssey - Pacific Passage : July 2000 - October 2000

The R.V. Odyssey embarked on a long oceanic passage from the Galapagos Islands to Christmas Island, Kiribati.

Relive the experiences of the crew and scientists aboard this epic journey.
Click on each image to see a larger photo.

You will need the Real Player, to watch video or listen to the logs.


October 11, 2000
On Christmas Island (Kiritimati) in Republic of Kirbati, a local fisherman dodges some low-flying frigate birds.
Listen to the latest Odyssey Log:
Christmas Arrival- Real Audio
Photo: Josh Jones
October 8, 2000
The sun sets on the R.V. Odyssey as it nears Christmas Island in the Republic of Kirbati.
Listen to the latest Odyssey Log:
Approaching Christmas Island - Real Audio
Photo: Josh Jones
October 2, 2000
Sarah Sheffield plots the course of the R.V. Odyssey on the chart table during her nightwatch.
Listen to a crewperson's experience of a nightwatch:
Nightwatch - Real Audio
Photo: Josh Jones
September 29, 2000
Josh Jones works on one of his many daily projects on the R.V. Odyssey.
Experience video of a day in the life of an Odyssey crewperson:
A Day in the Life: Part II - Real Video
Photo: David Day
September 25, 2000
Brian Hall works on one of his many daily duties as deckhand on the Odyssey.
Experience video of a day in the life of an Odyssey crewperson:
A Day in the Life: Part I - Real Video
Photo: David Day
September 21, 2000
The sleek, predatory, Oceanic White Tip shark thrives in tropical waters around the globe where it is warmer that 70 degrees fahrenheit (20 degrees Celsius). This shark is one of only seven of a possible four hundred known species to have attacked humans.
Watch footage of a unique, deep ocean encounter:
Oceanic White Tip Shark - Real Video
Photo: David Day
September 18, 2000
The crew of the Odyssey often encounter many species of plankton. Plankton are plants and animals that drift through the water, lacking the ability to swim against the ocean currents and waves. Sea jellies, more commonly known as jellyfish, are considered to be zooplankton. Not all plankton are animals; plants, including diatoms and dinoflagelletes which can cause red tides, are known as phytoplankton.
Listen to the Odyssey Log:
Plankton - Real Audio
Photo: David Day
September 15, 2000
Today, the crew of the Odyssey had the opportunity explore the rainforest of Nuka Hiva.
Listen to the Odyssey Log:
Exploring French Polynesia - Real Audio
Photo: Josh Jones
September 13, 2000
Today, the Odyssey took time out to provision and refuel in the French Polynesian island, Nuka Hiva. Stone statues called Tikis, sit along the shoreline.
Listen to the Odyssey Log:
Nuka Hiva - Real Audio
Photo: Josh Jones
September 8, 2000
After a long ocean passage from the Galapagos Islands, the French Polynesian island, Oa Huka, comes into view.
Listen to the Odyssey Log:
First Sight of Land - Real Audio
Photo: David Day
September 6, 2000
To take on more fuel and food, the Odyssey has made a course change and is heading toward the Marquesas, an island group in French Polynesia. As we draw closer to land, we had our first visit from a red-tailed tropic bird.
Listen to the Odyssey Log:
A Course Change - Real Audio
Photo: David Day
September 4, 2000
Scrolled File Fish are generally reef fish living in under 30 meters of water. However, Odyssey divers found them under a Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) buoy in deep, ooen ocean water. The TAO project, run by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is designed to improve the detection, prediction and understanding of El Nino.
Watch the video:
Life Beneath a TAO Buoy - Real Video
Photo: David Day
September 1, 2000
The Odyssey came across a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) Buoy. The TAO project is designed to improve the detection, prediction and understanding of El Nino.
Listen to the Odyssey Log:
Tropical Atmosphere Ocean Buoy - Real Audio
Photo: David Day
August 30, 2000
A satellite image showing chlorophyll levels across the Pacific Ocean from Sept, 1997 to May, 2000. The light colored band along the equatorial region represent high levels of chlorophyll which related to increased levels of ocean productivity. It is in this region that the Odyssey is currently conducting research.
Listen to the Odyssey Log:
Equatorial Upwelling - Real Audio
Photo: Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and ORBIMAGE
http://seawifs.gsfc.nasa.gov/seawifs.html
August 28, 2000
Today, a white faced storm petril flew into our galley. It was soon to released back into the wild by Captain Bob Wallace.
Listen to the Odyssey Log:
A Visit from a White Faced Storm Petrel - Real Audio
Photo: Sarah Sheffield
August 25, 2000
As the Odyssey experiences rough seas, even the most simple of daily tasks can become difficult. The ship may rock 40 or 50 degrees to each side, as winds pick up to 20 plus knots and waves grow to 12 feet or more.
Listen to the Odyssey Log:
Rough Seas - Real Audio
Photo: David Day
August 23, 2000
The lower jaw of a sperm whale on display at the Peter Foulger Museum in Nantucket, Massachusetts. Iain Kerr estimates that this eighteen foot jaw bone may have belonged to a sperm whale as large as eighty two and a half feet in length. It is believed a whale of similiar size was responsible for sinking the Essex.
Listen to the Odyssey Log:
Iain Kerr descibes the Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex - Real Audio
Photo: Courtesy of the Nantucket Historical Association
August 21, 2000
A sketch made by the cabinboy Thomas Nickerson of the 80 foot sperm whale ramming the whaleship Essex on November 20, 1820. He was one of the twenty one crew members aboard, cast into the ocean after the whaleship was sunk by the infamous whale. This event inspired the writing of Moby Dick by Herman Melville.
Listen to the Odyssey Log:
Losing Your Mother Ship- Real Audio
Photo: Courtesy of the Nantucket Historical Association
August 18, 2000
The R.V. Odyssey is currently collecting scientific data in an area which was previous known as the "offshore whaling grounds" of the 1800s. This was a favored area of the Yankee whalers due to the large concentrations of sperm whales.
Listen to the Odyssey Log:
To be a whaler - Real Audio
Photo: David Day

August 17, 2000
Pilot Whales viewed through the Odyssey BOWCAM. They are amongst the largest of dolphins along with killer whales and false killer whales.
Listen to the Odyssey Log:
Theories of Sperm Whale Aggregation - Real Audio
Photo: David Day

August 13, 2000
Sarah Davidson, the Chief Scientist of the Pacific Leg of the Voyage of the Odyssey, observes and collects data on sperm whales from the observation deck.
Listen to the Odyssey Log:
Theories of Sperm Whale Aggregation - Real Audio
Photo: David Day

August 10, 2000
Josh Jones watches as Fraser's dolphins leap in front of our bow.
Listen to the Odyssey Log:
Fraser's Dolphins - Real Audio
Photo: David Day

August 9, 2000
An underwater picture of the Odyssey BOWCAM. A camera is housed inside the starboard hull and allows us to capture video from an very unique underwater perspective.
Watch the video:
Species Interaction on the BOWCAM - Real Video
Photo: Josh Jones

August 7, 2000
The Odyssey encounters a large group of sperm whales.
Listen to the log:
The Sea Comes Alive - Real Audio
Photo: David Day

August 5, 2000
These squid are just a sample of the variety found in the Odyssey's scuppers last night.
Listen to the log:
Squid in the Scuppers - Real Audio
Photo: Sarah Sheffield

August 2, 2000
Today, Odyssey cameraman David Day, swam with a group of pilot whales.
Watch footage of this underwater encounter-
Swimming with Pilot Whales - Real Video
Photo: David Day

July 28, 2000
Marine Coordinator/First Mate, Josh Jones concentrates on identifying the whale sounds as they are picked up by the acoustic array.
Listen to the related Odyssey log-
Sounds on the Array - Real Audio
Photo: Sarah Sheffield

July 26, 2000
The crew enjoys one last glimp of land for 45 days as we leave the Galapagos Islands for one of the longest passages in the three year expedition.
Listen to the related Odyssey log-
Our Final Sight of Land - Real Audio
Photo: David Day

July 24, 2000
Deckhand, Brian Hall, prepares the provisions on the aft deck. Today, the Odyssey left the Galapagos Islands after a four month survey to cross the Pacific Ocean.
Listen to the related Odyssey log-
The Odyssey Departs Galapagos - Real Audio
Photo: Sarah Sheffield

July 23, 2000
The R.V. Odyssey readies to embark on the third leg of the voyage, the Pacific passage.
Listen to the related Odyssey log-
The Night Before the Departure - Real Audio
Photo: Genevieve Johnson

 
 
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