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Click on the links below to view video clips from Episode 2, (uses Real Player plug-in).

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Teachers' Working Conditions
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Teachers' Work: The CITE Program
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The Teachers' Calling
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The Origins of Teachers' Unions
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Teachers' Responsibilities
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Teachers and Burn-out
Only A Teacher
About The Series
About the Series
episode1: A Teacher Affects Eternity
episode2: Those Who Can... Teach
episode3: Educating to End Inequity

Episode Two: Those Who Can... Teach

"I honestly think that the way people look at teachers still today is the old adage, 'Those who can... do, those who can't... teach,' which really is hurtful." -- Constance LaGrange

Tom Sutton left a well-paid job in industrial sales and followed his heart to a fourth-grade classroom. Renee Crawford, the mother of two young children, decided she could truly influence the lives of kids in an urban school: she'd been one of those children herself. Constance LaGrange gave up her plans to be a child psychologist, realizing that she could help more children by teaching in an elementary school. All three joined Michelle Strunk, a traditional student, in an unconventional teacher training program at the University of Cincinnati.

Tom, Renee and Constance represent the changing face of teaching today: many incoming teachers are now older; they may be male; they may be people of color. But when they arrive in the classroom, they confront the same professional issues that all teachers have always grappled with. Episode Two, "Those Who Can...Teach," explores the issues that define teaching as a profession. It raises questions about teacher training, salaries, civil rights, autonomy, and union membership. In this episode, the background of these often contentious issues sheds light on how the teaching profession developed and where it stands today.

We meet the strong-willed reformer Catharine Beecher, of the famous crusading Beecher family. Her determination to educate women teachers began to change the 19th century's perception of women's work.

We encounter Viola Duvall Stewart, who in the 1940s joined the young Thurgood Marshall to sue for equal pay for black and white teachers in the city of Charleston.

We learn about Margaret Haley of Chicago, the leader of the first major teachers union, who declared in 1904 that a teacher should be paid at least as much as a lady's maid.

We hear from Jeannette DiLorenzo and Alice Marsh, who helped revive the New York City Teachers Union. Despite criticism, they will always believe that unions are the best lobbyists for children.




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