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The Truth About Philadelphia
Program 1

Slyvia "Tata" Acaba Roberts
Community Activist, Kensington


Question #3: Our country was founded here. How does this fact affect the attitudes of the people who live in the city?

Glenn: Do you think that people realize that the country was founded here and, if so, does that make them feel good about the City, or, or, or?

Tata: If they know about it, but at this point they don't care because of the way they're living. You know, it's like they don't care. They just want to sell and leave. They don't care about what's here, you know, it's an historical anything because of what's going on; all the drug dealing, being afraid of coming out. They really don't care. At this moment, they don't care. I know that's hard to ask that question.

Glenn: What is your greatest fear about the city of Philadelphia?

Tata: That it will fall apart because we, we're not united. It's going to fall apart. Nobody's getting together. Everybody's on their own; here, there, everywhere. And no one's there, you know, trying to get united. We're gonna fall apart. Do you, see how the Chinese people are? They're united. They work together. They do everything together? We're not. Everybody's out, out on their own, instead of uniting. While we're falling apart, the Chinese people are going to be together. That's what, that's what's going to tear us apart. There's no unity.

Glenn: And what would the end goal be? What's the dream scenario?

Tata: To don't see no more drug dealers in these corners and the kids can come out and play in peace, that when a kid is standing in the corner either they're waiting for somebody to pick them up, or they're playing. But they're not selling drugs on the corner. That, that, that's. I would love to see that happen, that you can walk the street in peace, not afraid that someone's going to be in corner cross fire. That's what I would, that's what I would like to see happen in the end.

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