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Divas & Superstars

Chapter 5: J. Lo, Marc Anthony & the Latin Wave

[FOOTAGE: "ON THE SIX" JENNIFER LOPEZ]

Mottola released other artists in quick succession. "On the Six," by Jennifer López, hit the stores on June first, only three weeks after the release of the album "Ricky Martin."

A tribute to her roots in the Bronx, "On the Six" included cameos by Puerto Rican rappers Big Pun and Fat Joe.

[FOOTAGE: "ON THE SIX" JENNIFER LOPEZ]

JLO ARCHIVAL FOOTAGE: (OC) I wanted to go back to my neighborhood in the Bronx. Get on the train that (VO) I used to get on and, and just and (OC) just relive that.

[FOOTAGE: "ON THE SIX" JENNIFER LOPEZ]

[FOOTAGE: LOPEZ DANCING]

LIN MANUEL MIRANDA (VO) She was a 'Flygirl' on "In Living Color." (OC) She was one of the hot girls who danced to Hip-Hop in the transitions between comedy skits.

[FOOTAGE: LOPEZ DANCING]

[FOOTAGE: FAT JOE: "BORICUA"]

(VO) And to do a song with Big Pun and Fat Joe (OC) cemented what was already there in terms of (VO) her accessibility to urban Latinos.

[FOOTAGE: JENNIFER LOPEZ DANCING]

TOMMY MOTTOLA (VO) The thing about Jennifer is the whole package. And the fact that she was Latino was a way to take a New York girl, basically and present her to the public and say, (OC) "here is a shining example of a Latina."

[STILL AND FOOTAGE MONTAGE: JENNIFER LOPEZ]

LIN MANUEL (VO) She's sort of our 21st century Marilyn Monroe. She is beyond actress. She is beyond singer. She is this icon. She is (OC) literally the cultural shorthand for Puerto Rican for the world, literally for the globe.

[FOOTAGE MONTAGE: MARC ANTHONY]

Next on the list was Marc Anthony. His English-language album, in the works for more than a year, was released in September 1999.

TOMMY MOTTOLA (VO) Marc Anthony became another great success. Capitalizing on both popular music in English and using his Latin base (OC) to do many songs in Spanish and really marketed to both audiences in a big way.

[FOOTAGE: MARC ANTHONY AT MADISON SQUARE GARDEN]

[MARC ANTHONY] ["Boricua! Wave that beautiful flag, folks.

I'm just happy to be here.

Check it out baby. ']

[FOOTAGE: MARC ANTHONY PERFORMING " I NEED TO KNOW" AT MADISON SQUARE GARDEN]

The album was promoted at a sold-out concert in Madison Square Garden. The audience was largely Latino. But the HBO broadcast reached twenty five million households — most of them English speaking.

[FOOTAGE: MARC ANTHONY AT MADISON SQUARE GARDEN] [MARC ANTHONY: "Hello HBO!"]

TOMMY MOTTOLA (VO) Certainly the Latin demographic was getting huge and I think, musically, the country was (OC) ready for something new and fresh and exciting.

[MONTAGE OF MAGAZINE COVERS - "SHEBANG" RICKY MARTIN]

(VO)...starting from Gloria and the whole Miami Sound Machine influence, right to Ricky and then when Marc Anthony came out and then Jennifer López. (OC) All of that culminating at once, uh, created, what Time magazine then billed, as the "Latin Explosion."

[CHARLIE ROSE SHOW ARCHIVAL CLIP:]

MARC ANTHONY You know, you hear day in-day out about this "Latin Music Explosion" and stuff like that, when the music that that the world is being exposed to at this time, be it through Ricky Martin, Jennifer Lopez or Enrique Iglesias or myself, is not truly representative of Latin music.

CHARLIE ROSE Does it annoy you? Does it make you happy? Does it in some ways put you in a place where you are kind of lumped together with a lot of other artists?

MARC ANTHONY I'd rather not be ...(Charlie Rose: "lumped together") ...at all. I don't think anybody, anyone of us. Because it's almost like we're invading or something or

[FOOTAGE: MARC ANTHONY NYC PARADE]

(VO) like we don't belong, or we're not from here and we're coming from somewhere else. And I was born and raised in New York City!

LIN MANUEL MIRANDA (VO) You know, I think Latinos (OC) we, we are so hungry to see ourselves represented in mainstream culture that to see it us suddenly bombarded with it was a really overwhelming experience.

[STILLS OF YOUNG LIN MANUAL]

Lin Manuel Miranda began writing a musical about growing up Latino, in New York's Washington Heights.

LIN MANUEL MIRANDA Latin music was something I'd always listened to at home and I listened to popular music at school with my friends and they'd never met. I listened to Jerry Rivera. I listened to Marc Anthony. I listened to Gilberto Santa Rosa. But I could never share that with my white friends. And suddenly my white friends are walking around going around "¡bailamos!" And it was a heady time.

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