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Featured Lesson Plan
  • Fatwa and Human Rights
  • Student Handout: Discussion Questions Following Viewing
  • Student Handout: The Power of the Fatwa
  • Student Handout: Osama bin Laden and Holy War

  • Additional Lesson Ideas
  • Political Messages
  • Media Messages
  • Women's Rights in Saudi Arabia
  • Violence and Saudi Arabia

  • Internet Resources

    Printable .pdf of Entire Guide
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    » Lesson Plan

    » Lesson Objectives:

    In this lesson, students will evaluate:

    • The importance of the fatwa in Islamic countries
    • The impact of Wahhabism on Saudi Arabia
    • How Osama bin Laden has used the fatwa to justify terrorism

    » Materials Needed:

    Internet Access
    Student Handout: Discussion Questions Following Viewing
    Student Handout: The Power of the Fatwa
    Student Handout: Osama bin Laden and Holy War

    » Time Needed:

    10 – 15 minutes for students to read key definitions and a brief overview of the Islamic faith
    120 minutes to watch the documentary
    10 – 15 minutes to discuss the documentary
    5 – 20 minutes to read and discuss the questions on each student handout
    10 – 15 minutes for a large group discussion on the causes of terrorism

    » Procedure:

    1. Instruct students to read the definitions and facts on the Islamic faith and then answer the questions as they view the documentary.

    2. Conduct a large group discussion using the questions on the student handout Discussion Questions Following Viewing.

    3. Divide the class into small groups and have them read and discuss the materials on the student handouts: The Power of the Fatwa and Osama bin Laden and Holy War. Each student should take notes on the questions.

    4. Reconvene the class as a large group. Put on the board or overhead "Is terrorism driving the United States foreign policy or is the United States foreign policy driving terrorism?" Have students assess this question in light of the documentary and their readings.

    5. Homework: Tell the students to write a one- to two-page paper analyzing the question: "Is terrorism driving the United States foreign policy or is the United States foreign policy driving terrorism?"

    » Method of Assessment:

    Class discussion
    Completion of handouts
    Homework

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