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Once Upon a Time in Iran: 1979

09 Jul 2011 15:01Comments
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Picturing the Past

[ spotlight ] The 1979 Iranian Revolution continues to inspire headlines, controversy -- and art. Two very different artists take up the subject by focusing on their own extended families. One is nostalgic for the past, the Iran "Before the Chador," "before the government told people how to dress, before home became prison, before fear became part of the Iranian heart and soul," in the words of L.A.-based rapper Malkovich Music, whose Jewish Iranian family and their photo albums were the inspiration for a recent exhibit.

To German-trained Maziar Moradi, "1979," was the year "the Iranian population finally succeeded to overthrow the nationalistic and pro-American regime of the Pahlavi monarchy through massive demonstrations and nationwide strikes." Just a year later, the Iran-Iraq War began. Moradi's family was among the countless to suffer losses during the eight-year conflict. Through elaborately staged photos, members of his family tell their tales through "the individual circumstances of life [rather] than the political situation," he says.


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Copyright © 2011

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