Charles & Ray Eames: The Architect and the Painter

Essay: A Short Biography of Charles and Ray Eames

Charles and Ray Eames headed the most creative design office in post World War II America. Frequently photographed in matching clothes, poses, or both, each brought a rich array of talents to their life/work partnership (1941-1978) as well as a contagious enthusiasm for life and art.

Bill T. Jones: A Good Man

Interview: Creative Director Bjorn Amelan

Creative Director Bjorn Amelan explains the process of collaboration between the production designers, technical crew, and artists when creating new work for Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company. Bill T. Jones: A Good Man premieres nationally Friday, November 11 at 9 p.m. on PBS (check local listings) as part of the first PBS Arts Fall […]

Bob Dylan: No Direction Home

Music & Film Credits

Below are the full music credits for NO DIRECTION HOME, as well a list of uncredited appearances. Music (in order of appearance) Like a Rolling Stone Written and Performed By Bob Dylan Drifting Too Far From The Shore Written by Chas Moody BMG Film and TV Music Performed by Bill Monroe and His Bluegrass Boys […]

Bob Dylan: No Direction Home

Chronicle Excerpts of Chapter 5: River of Ice

An excerpt from Bob Dylan’s autobiography: On the corner I put the dime in the slot and dialed the operator for long distance, called collect and the call went right through. I wanted everyone to know I was all right. My mother would usually give me the latest run of the mill stuff. My father had his own way of looking at things. To him life was hard work. He’d come from a generation of different values, heroes and music, and wasn’t so sure that the truth would set anybody free. He was pragmatic and always had a word of cryptic advice. “Remember, Robert, in life anything can happen. Even if you don’t have all the things you want, be grateful for the things you don’t have that you don’t want.”

Bob Dylan: No Direction Home

Biographical Essay from the Kennedy Center Honors

In 1997, Bob Dylan was a Kennedy Center Honoree. Below is the text of a speech given by writer and music critic Tom Piazza for that occasion. The central question for an American artist – both as an American and as an artist – is how to remain indivisibly oneself while, in Walt Whitman’s phrase, […]

Bob Dylan: No Direction Home

About the Film

No Direction Home: Bob Dylan A Martin Scorsese Picture Bob Dylan Opens Archives For The Film, Which Features Previously Unreleased Footage From Dylan’s Groundbreaking Live Concerts, Studio Recording Sessions, Outtakes, And Interviews In an event that has brought together Bob Dylan and Martin Scorsese, NO DIRECTION HOME: BOB DYLAN, a production of Spitfire Pictures, Grey […]

Edgar Allan Poe: Terror of the Soul

About Edgar Allan Poe

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December, And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor. Eagerly I wished the morrow;–vainly I had sought to borrow From my books surcease of sorrow—sorrow for the lost Lenore– For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels named Lenore– Nameless here for […]

Muddy Waters: Can’t Be Satisfied

Filmmaker Interview – Robert Gordon and Morgan Neville

Filmmakers Robert Gordon and Morgan Neville were kind enough to answer some questions about their film. Q: What first got you interested in doing a film of Muddy Waters? Robert Gordon: I was writing Muddy’s biography for Little, Brown and, in order to get closer to Muddy, I began hunting up film and video performances […]

Robert Motherwell and the New York School

About Robert Motherwell

“To end up with a canvas that is no less beautiful than the empty canvas is to begin with.” In 1940, a young painter named Robert Motherwell came to New York City and joined a group of artists — including Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko and Franz Kline — who set out to […]

Greenwich Village: A Hub for American Masters

In the lower part of Manhattan, between Houston Street and West 14th Street, and from the Hudson River to Broadway, is what is known as Greenwich Village. Today, the neighborhood closest to the Hudson is known as the West Village. The area between Broadway and the East River, which has long been known as the […]