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The Day Carl Sandburg Died

Full Film

It’s life and times of American Master, Carl Sandburg. See the film, The Day Carl Sandburg Died, from American Masters and writer, director and editor, Paul Bonesteel.

The Day Carl Sandburg Died

Carl Sandburg Reads “Arches”

See and hear Carl Sandburg read “Arches”: an excerpt from The Day Carl Sandburg Died.

The Day Carl Sandburg Died

Carl Sandburg: A Tall Man

Carl Sandburg was a tall tale. Yes, he was only a man. But, his words were Paul Bunyan; his words were John Henry: impossibly real. The way Sandburg wrote, he gave life to anything and everything around him: from mountains to oceans, from prairies to rows of corn or cotton. Skyscrapers, too.

The Day Carl Sandburg Died

Gallery: The Carl Sandburg Archive

An exploration of the Carl Sandburg Archive from the Rare Book & Manuscript Library at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign.

The Day Carl Sandburg Died

Carl Sandburg on Chicago, U.S.A.

See and hear Carl Sandburg’s Chicago in a scene from The Day Carl Sandburg Died. It’s a city that’s the archetype of America: where we all come from. And, that’s what came through in Sandburg’s work from when he first wrote “Chicago” and published it as a part of Chicago Poems in 1916.

The Day Carl Sandburg Died

Filmmaker Interview: Paul Bonesteel

See and hear Paul Bonesteel, writer, director and editor of ‘The Day Carl Sandburg Died,’ talk about how the film was made: the process, the characters, the interviews, and the history.

The Day Carl Sandburg Died

Norman Corwin: Go On Spider

The late and great Norman Corwin was from the generation after Carl Sandburg’s. Writing for radio in the 1930s and 40s, Corwin’s broadcast titles included, “The Plot to Overthrow Christmas,” a drama entirely in rhyming verse in which demons and historical figures from Hell tried to destroy Christmas, and “They Fly through the Air with the Greatest of Ease,” a gutty reaction to the Spanish Civil War. Corwin used the airwaves for morality plays–a medium to comment on society through entertainment.

See and hear Corwin on how he tried to echo Sandburg throughout his life.