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Berga: Soldiers of Another War
Stories of Berga What Would You Do? Timeline & Maps Berga and Beyond War Crimes
Intro POWs and the Laws of War WWII and Its Legacy
POWs and the Laws of War
Intro Traditional Laws of War World War II and Berga The Legacy of WWII

The Legacy of WWII
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Captured soldiers

Captured American soldiers being marched from the Battle of the Bulge. Many of these men were taken to Berga.







During the war-crimes trials that followed in World War II's wake, the German defendants challenged the applicability of the 1929 Geneva Convention to the conflict. Despite the fact that the Convention had been signed and ratified by the Reich Government of Germany, the United States, the United Kingdom, and nearly every other party to the conflict, the German officers asserted that the Convention did not apply to any party because the Soviet Union was not a signator. The Nuremberg Tribunal rejected the German officers' argument and held that the 1929 Geneva Convention was binding because it articulated general principles of international law that are binding on all nations in a conflict, despite one party's non-ratification of the Convention.


The Geneva Conventions of 1949 included an entire convention that addressed the identification, treatment, and protection of prisoners of war.
Just as World War I changed the international laws governing the treatment of prisoners of war, the world community's response to the atrocities committed at places like Berga during World War II brought about even more dramatic changes to the international conventions governing armed conflict. The Geneva Conventions of 1949 included an entire convention, Convention III, that addressed the identification, treatment, and protection of prisoners of war. Once again building off prior Conventions, the 1949 Convention sought to further clarify, define, and heighten the standards of treatment afforded prisoners of war.






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