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Tony and Tacky
February 18, 2005

Good taste or bad is revealed in everything we are, do, have. Emily Post


The Gates Bravo to Gates Keeper
Life-spans of all major works of Christo and Jeanne-Claude are brief by design -- the artists say to increase the sense of urgency, love and tenderness one has for something that is not meant to last. Luckily this was not the case for two young dogs taking in the saffron gate exhibit recently in Central Park, says Dorothy Rabinowitz. She awards a tony, not to "The Gates" artists, but to an exhibit monitor. "Two dogs break away from their owners and head straight for a pond, which is covered with thin ice. The ice breaks, the dogs go through it and there they are about to die, surrounded by a wall of ice, whereupon one of the monitors of 'The Gates' takes a huge pole -- the kind they use to unfurl those gates -- and wades deep in up to his shoulders, smashes through the ice and opens a gateway for the dogs to get out safely."

Sheik Lawyer Faces Time Lynn Stewart
A jury convicted defense attorney Lynn Stewart of conspiring to aid terrorism and she now faces up to 30 years in jail. Says Bret Stephens: "Lynn Stewart is a 65-year-old self-described radical lawyer who was convicted by a New York jury for passing messages from Sheik Abdel Rahman in a U.S. prison to his followers in Egypt. I think a tony is owed to 12 very brave jurors who understand that our civil liberties are best defended by putting terrorists and their helpers behind bars -- even when it means throwing grandma from the train."

hockey player Say, What's on PBS?
It's official -- the NHL season has been cancelled. Pretty tacky says Daniel Henninger, but even worse, who cares? Most fans likely stopped paying much attention long ago, he says. "Money has pushed out the games and the competition and the professional athletes are by and large responsible for this," says Henninger. "The other thing that's going on right now is Major League Baseball. Are we talking about baseball? No, we're talking about steroids and Jose Conseco's supposed revelation. The problem is that the athletes have turned the fans into cynics and so when something like this hockey season comes, people go 'So what? I've got other things to do with my time and money.'"