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Tony and Tacky
March 18, 2005

Good taste or bad is revealed in everything we are, do, have. Emily Post


1st Battalion 24th Marines When In Detroit
The United Auto Workers union (UAW) has long banned foreign cars from its parking lots, but had made an exception for members of the 1st Battalion 24th Marines in Detroit. Recently the union told Marine reservists they could not park in the UAW Solidarity House lot if they drove foreign automobiles or if they had pro-Bush bumper stickers, the president, in their view, being anti-labor. The result of the parking lot strongarming, says Jason Riley, was a backlash. "People were threatening to buy automobiles from non-union manufacturers like Toyota and Nissan instead of Fords and Chevy's," says Riley. Ultimately, UAW President Gettelfinger, himself a former Marine, apologized and invited the Marines back to the parking lot. "But the Marines have said, 'Never mind, we'll find someplace else to park' and I say good for them," says Riley.

Drive Out the Snakes Gerry Ted Kennedy
Senator Edward Kennedy celebrated St. Patrick's Day by spending time with the sisters of a man whose death has been blamed on the Irish Republican Army, rather than with Sinn Fein's Gerry Adams. Spurred on by such IRA violence, Kennedy joined others in declining to meet with the leader of Sinn Fein, the IRA's political wing. A big tony for Teddy, says Robert Pollock. "One of the great mysteries after September 11th has been Gerry Adams' ability to defy political gravity in a world where nobody accepts the old saw that one man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter. Finally, that's starting to change for Adams. Kudos to Teddy for recognizing that."

Hitler All Things Not Being Equal
As world leaders gathered in Jerusalem this week to commemorate the Holocaust, C-SPAN decided to air a Holocaust scholar Deborah Lipstadt, provided there was equal airtime to David Irving, a British Holocaust denier. A tacky for the cable service, says Bret Stephens. "I understand that C-SPAN wants to give equal time to Democrats as well as to Republicans, both sides of the issues, but when you decide that there ought to be balance between Holocaust deniers and scholars of the Holocaust, between people who are telling lies and people who are telling the truth, you've traveled a long road down the way towards moral relativism," says Stephens. "It's a shame that C-SPAN has allowed itself to be hijacked this way. A tacky for them."