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Tony and Tacky
November 25, 2005

Good taste or bad is revealed in everything we are, do, have. Emily Post


Napster Makes No Cents
There are legal ways to download music off the web, but the music industry says a lot of people still don't get the message. "The music industry has every right, of course, to pursue people who are pirating music on the Internet," says Jason Riley. "And they chose to do so, typically, by suing them. The only problem with this strategy is that it doesn't seem to be working. The number of people downloading music illegally continues to increase, and the music industry continues to file lawsuits. I think a better course might be for them to embrace this technology and figure out a way to make money off of it, rather than essentially suing their customers, which might not be the best business model."

Lending a Hand an Iraqi woman looks at US Army soldier Cpt. Jeremy Ostermiller, a physician assistant
A Thanksgiving tony for the U.S. servicefolk in Iraq, says Dan Henninger. "It's traditional on this weekend to air footage of the troops in faraway places sitting down at the barracks tables having a turkey dinner," says Henninger. "I'd like to draw a little bit of attention to the good that goes on in faraway places like Iraq, that is done by these troops beyond their primary mission. Over the last couple years, the troops in Iraq have, for instance, built 39 new schools in southern Iraq that are being attended by 8000 students. They've restored the water and sewage system in Mosul, they have been building health clinics and hospitals around the country that now allow Iraqis to get emergency care, X-rays, and vaccinations. Up in the northern part of Iraq they have created literacy programs, so that the Kurds up there who actually were forced to go to Arabic-only schools by Saddam, can learn to read and write. Now it seems to me that at the most basic level of human sharing and giving, we really have to give credit to these American troops. Thanks to them, they are going to leave Iraq, I suspect, a better place than they found it."