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December 2 , 2005

Transcript

PAUL GIGOT: Winners and losers, picks and pans. We call it Tony and Tacky, our choices for the best and the worst of the week. What's wrong with this? Well, according to the NCAA, it's so disrespectful that it should be banned from all future sports events. Steve, tony or tacky?

STEVE MOORE: Paul, you were probably wondering why I'm wearing my orange and blue tie today, and it's because I'm a University of Illinois alum. And the people in my home state of Illinois are outraged by this decision. The NCAA has basically said that our beloved Chief Illiniwek is a hostile and abusive symbol and mascot, and has to be gotten rid of.

Now the truth is, number one, that this is a reverential symbol that is respectful of Indians. And the truth is that if you look at the situation across the country with mascots, the Indians are treated with great respect. The Indians aren't even complaining about these mascots. It's liberals. And so I love the new bumper stickers that we're seeing in Illinois these days, which say, "Keep Illiniwek, fire the NCAA."

PAUL GIGOT: Thanks, Steve. Following the accident at the Thanksgiving Day parade last week, there were the expected headlines about the need to investigate why it happened. But there was no headline saying "father of injured girl sues for 20 million dollars." Kim, do you think there's a tony in here somewhere?

KIM STRASSEL: Yeah, this is a huge tony to the Chamberlain family, which were out watching the parade last week when an M&M balloon went crazy, ran into a light fixture, which fell on two of Mr. Chamberlain's daughters and gave them cuts and bruises that sent them to the hospital. Now, you would think if there was anyone out there that was a candidate for 1-800-LAWYER it would be this guy. I mean, there's a precedent. In 1997 a balloon got loose, injured a couple of people, and it resulted in a 395 million dollar lawsuit that was settled out of court. Also, let's be blunt. One of Mr. Chamberlain's daughters who was injured has cerebral palsy. She's in a wheelchair. She would be a very sympathetic figure in front of a court. Instead, this guy said, it was an accident. And you know, the truth is Americans like to complain that there are too many lawsuits, but often when they're the ones that are given the chance to cash in, they're only too willing to do it. So I think we should all be giving thanks that on Thanksgiving there was a guy who was such a role model for the nation.

PAUL GIGOT: All right, thanks, Kim.