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    “An illness is a story for people. It’s a chapter in their life. It may be, in some cases, the last chapter in their life. Your chance to be the author of what happens in your story is fundamental to the meaning of people’s lives. That story of what happens is how we think, it’s how we breathe, it’s how we live our whole life.” More

    February 9, 2015 | Comments

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    A conversation about the US measles outbreak; parents who refuse to vaccinate their children based on personal beliefs; and an organization called Final Salute that meets the needs of homeless women veterans and their children. More

    February 6, 2015 | Comments

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    “There’s really no widespread religious objection to the [measles] vaccine…It’s that I have a belief that these vaccines are harmful, or that they don’t work, or I don’t believe that somebody else should be telling me how to raise my kids,” says Religion News Service editor-in-chief Kevin Eckstrom. More

    February 6, 2015 | Comments

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    In most states, parents can choose not to vaccinate their children based on a personal or religious objection. It’s a choice that has begun raising concerns about the ethics of refusal and the rising risk of outbreaks. More

    February 6, 2015 | Comments

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    “We are still not getting it as a country, and we’re making a poor effort as a society to take care of all our veterans…We can liberate other countries and clear up their natural disasters. Women veterans are now America’s natural disaster,” says Final Salute founder Jaspen Boothe. More

    February 6, 2015 | Comments

  • feat-natl-prayer-breakfast-4-800

    People from many faiths gathered in Washington for the 63rd annual National Prayer Breakfast, including the Dalai Lama. One major theme this year was fighting religious extremism, which President Obama said “is not unique to one group or one religion.” More

    February 6, 2015 | Comments

  • feat-1822-full-episode-800-3

    A new program encourages seminaries and divinity schools to teach more science; a community organizer helps improve living conditions for the very poor in India’s sprawling slums and around the world; a famous Trappist monk, poet, activist, contemplative, and prolific writer would have been 100 years old this year. More

    January 30, 2015 | Comments

  • feat-science-for-seminaries-800

    “If our earth is not the only inhabitable world, what does that imply?” asks Dr. Jennifer Wiseman, director of the Dialogue on Science, Ethics, and Religion at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. “That’s an exciting question and the kind of thing I hope will be discussed with joy in these institutions.” More

    January 30, 2015 | Comments

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    Jockin Arputham started his campaign to build a network among the urban poor by organizing a critical mass of India’s slum-dwelling population, especially women’s collectives. Today they pressure local governments to be more responsive to their needs, especially toilet and sanitation facilities. More

    January 30, 2015 | Comments

  • feat-thomas-merton-800

    “With the death of Thomas Merton, we lost really one of the great Catholic voices, one of the great prophetic figures within the Catholic Church. And I think that’s why his books are still selling, why they’re still being translated because that message is as relevant today as when he wrote it,” says Dr. Paul Pearson who oversees the Thomas Merton Center at Bellarmine University. More

    January 30, 2015