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September 21st, 2009
Time for School Series
Full Episode: Time for School 3

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  • althia beck

    I would like to know more about Joab and his brothers,an how thay are doing. I would bring them up as my own if i could.

  • Stephanie

    If anyone would like to sponsor a girl in Benin’s secondary school education, please visit http://www.batongafoundation.org or email info@batongafoundation.org

  • Ken Okoth

    To help orphans and vulnerable children like Joab in Kibera, you can make donations to the Children of Kibera Foundation, which focuses solely on educational opportunities like sponsorships, scholarships, feeding programs and other school improvement initiatives. our staff in Kibera is talking with Joab’s school to see if we can come up with a plan for channeling assistance received on his behalf before we promise all the concerned viewers that we will do it. Once we know for sure that we have a good plan to help Joab and his siblings, we will post it on our website and blog so you can begin to send specific donations for what is needed to make life better. http://www.childrenofkibera.org is our website. Thanks for your generosity!

  • Anne

    As much as I love this program, I can’t help but feel that it would be considerably better if you didn’t take up so much time with ‘recaps.’ This is not so terrible in Time for School 3, but in Back to School it was terrible because there was barely 5 minutes of new material per child.

  • Wide Angle

    For those of you who have expressed interest in helping the children in the film, please visit our “How You Can Help” page: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/wideangle/episodes/time-for-school-series/how-you-can-help/5521/

    There are organizations listed in the Kenya and Benin sections that work specifically with the kids in the film from those countries, Joab and Nanavi, as well as organizations that help children in each of the countries featured in the film.

    Children of Kibera and Batonga Foundation, the two organizations mentioned in this discussion, are both on our list of recommendations for how you can help.

  • Sadiq Fazel

    Thank You Wide Angle.
    Excellent Film and Most appreciations to translators.
    Hope to have these 7 children updates in near future.
    Keep up with the good work.
    Please donate something to these non-profit organization.
    Cost of education in these countries are cheaper. We can definitely provide basic need of books,pencils and Food.
    And thanks for the letters they wrote.

  • LaVerne Jackson

    I would very much like to help Joab, his sister and brother. I was very inspired by him. I am not rich, but I would like to help him realize his dream of becoming an engineer. If only I could donate so that he would not have to worry about food and school supplies.

  • Sharon Dusenberry

    I would definitely like to help Joab and his siblings in any way I possibly can. Is there a way to correspond with Joab directly? I earnestly want to write to Joab, share thoughts and ideas with him so he can reach his dream of becoming an engineer, and realize it can be accomplished. I also would like to contribute money, food, clothing, whatever I can to help him and his siblings, maybe make things a little easier, knowing they have friends in the world, and people that care for their well being.

  • Karen Weiner

    Kudos to Wide Angle for the wonderful work they have done once again in ‘Time for School 3′ and in the entire series! I am a teacher on Long Island & the advisor of Kenya Krew, and I wanted to jump in to respond to some of the wonderful responses from so many of you. If you would like to assist the children of Ayany Primary School (Joab’s school), my students and I would welcome your donations to our project!

    I’m thrilled to see that so many people were spurred to action by Joab’s story — it is truly heart-wrenching, and he is an incredible inspiration.

    The group my students and I have started, Kenya Krew, is aimed at building a school library at Ayany Primary School (as many of you have read on Wide Angle’s website). We have raised about $8000 toward our goal of $15,000, but some of that money has been used to replace the desks in the 7th grade classroom at Ayany, and to create a temporary Reading Room for the students until the library is constructed. Therefore, we may actually end up having to raise more than the original $15,000 — we are in the process of reassessing the amount.

    We have been working closely with the principal of Joab’s school, and as you can see on the website, we have developed tran-Atlantic friendships with the Ayany children through our pen pal activities. While donations to Kenya Krew would not go directly to Joab and his siblings, they would benefit all of the children of Ayany, many of whose stories are equally compelling and inspirational. If you are interested in contributing to our Kenya Krew project, you may send your donation to my attention at Lawrence Middle School, 195 Broadway, Lawrence, NY 11559. Checks should be made to Lawrence Middle School, with “Kenya Krew” written in the Memo line. We wire money directly from our account to Joab’s school, so that we are assured that the money ends up where it is intended.

    Ken, your organization sounds like it is doing wonderful work — I would certainly be interested in connecting with you by phone or email to discuss further our shared interest in working with the children of Kibera.

    Thank you all for your interest in Joab, his siblings and all of the children of Kibera. Please feel free to respond to my posting if you have any questions regarding Kenya Krew, and of course we welcome your donations to our cause!

    Best wishes to all,
    Karen Weiner, Kenya Krew advisor (NY)

  • Karen Weiner

    Kudos to Wide Angle for the wonderful work they have done once again in ‘Time for School 3′ and in the entire series! I am a teacher on Long Island & the advisor of Kenya Krew, and I wanted to jump in to respond to some of the wonderful responses from so many of you. If you would like to assist the children of Ayany Primary School (Joab’s school), my students and I would welcome your donations to our project!

    I’m thrilled to see that so many people were spurred to action by Joab’s story — it is truly heart-wrenching, and he is an incredible inspiration.

    The group my students and I have started, Kenya Krew, is aimed at building a school library at Ayany Primary School (as many of you have read on Wide Angle’s website). We have raised about $8000 toward our goal of $15,000, but some of that money has been used to replace the desks in the 7th grade classroom at Ayany, and to create a temporary Reading Room for the students until the library is constructed. Therefore, we may actually end up having to raise more than the original $15,000 — we are in the process of reassessing the amount.

    We have been working closely with the principal of Joab’s school, and as you can see on the website, we have developed tran-Atlantic friendships with the Ayany children through our pen pal activities. While donations to Kenya Krew would not go directly to Joab and his siblings, they would benefit all of the children of Ayany, many of whose stories are equally compelling and inspirational. If you are interested in contributing to our Kenya Krew project, you may send your donation to my attention at Lawrence Middle School, 195 Broadway, Lawrence, NY 11559. Checks should be made to Lawrence Middle School, with “Kenya Krew” written in the Memo line. We wire money directly from our account to Joab’s school, so that we are assured that the money ends up where it is intended.

    Thank you all for your interest in Joab, his siblings and all of the children of Kibera. Please feel free to respond to my posting if you have any questions regarding Kenya Krew, and of course we welcome your donations to our cause!

    Best wishes to all,
    Karen Weiner, Kenya Krew advisor (NY)

  • Edie Hoffmann

    Thank you for the in-depth presentation of this very timely subject matter.
    I am an educator and would like to show excerpts from your video to my students.
    Those 7 children can be an inspiration to all who take education for granted.
    Well done.

  • C. Bedard

    Like all the others who posted comments I am moved by these children’s life stories in a wrenching as well as inspirational way. For those asking how to help these children “directly”, I can offer advice based on 20 years of experience with international development projects: Helping a child directly unfortunately can create more problems for the child than it solves. It can easily create jealousy from others in the community (imagine what someone like Joab’s father would do if he knew he was receiving money directly from foreign donors?…) and it can easily further ostracize the child when what he needs most is community support. A more respectful solution is to give money to local organizations that can in turn provide help to someone like Joab (like the food help program, the school, etc.). Look for other groups in the community that could help the child (maybe a mentoring organization, a child care organization). Do research, and find local help. Don’t send money directly to a child. Remember the Sept. 11 fund for windows… We who have money can feel compelled to send money, then it becomes overwhelming and even destructive, rather than help. There IS a way to help children like Joab, yes. But “indirectly”, by finding local helpers who can do something for him and others like him. It’s a tough lesson I learned which I wanted to share. I personally will research some local resources beyond those mentioned at PBS.

  • Sadiq Fazel

    I do so agree with C. Bedard.
    Supporting directly to Joab and his siblings could have detriment result with his father, friends and neighbors.
    The best and effective approach is to help Ayany Primary School (Joab’s school)through Kenya krew and kibera’s children altogether through http://www.childrenofkibera.org
    The founder of this organization is also high school teacher.
    I want to take this chance to personally thank teacher Karen Weiner for her support and encouraging her student in this project.
    With tears on my eyes, I was touched with pen pal activities.
    They were thankful for the small reading room.
    Lets not forget a child from Benin too, Nanavi.
    she is struggling since her father past away. Her father requested before his death that Nanavi should continue with school. I don’t know who runs the family’s small corn mill but certainly we all want to make a difference in her community by setting an example through Nanavi.

  • sharon m. brown

    My heart was touched by the stories of Joab and Nanavi. How can I help these children and become penpals.

  • Leila

    Thank you for this eye opening presentation. Joab’s story brought me to tears and made me stop to re-evaluate myself. All the things I take for granted day in and day out. I haven’t been able to stop thinking about this episode. I am praying for joab and would like to share the little that I have with him and his siblings. No child should have to go without food. Even as I write this I am overwhelmed with emotion. Isn’t there an organization that can adopt or help adopt these abandoned children. Please let me know if there is a way of corresponding with joab even as a penpal. Please!

  • Karen Weiner

    Thank you to Sadiq Fazel for your kind words about Kenya Krew and your encouragement that our project is making a difference. I also agree with the point that we should not forget the other wonderful children of “Time for School”. The Kenya Krew was created to work specifically with Joab and Ayany Primary School, but throughout Kenya there are many “Joabs”, and of coruse, children like Nanavi, Neeraj and Jefferson all need our attention and assistance too. So of course Kenya Krew would welcome donations for our project with Ayany Primary School, but we would love to also see other similar projects develop with the other “Time for School” kids.

  • Elenita

    Thanks to the Wide Angle crew for another fantastic installment of “Time for School.” I have been waiting for this episode for more than two years, and it does not disappoint. This is a fantastic way to put a human face (or rather, seven human faces) on a problem that is all too ignored and/or hidden behind endless statistics without enough context. I look forward to revisiting these kids in 2012.

    One thing not mentioned in the broadcast (but was on the website) was President Obama’s campaign promise to create a $2 billion Global Education Fund to help with this issue. As of yet, there have been no public plans to make that plan a reality. Consider writing and encouraging him to honor that pledge, and to make it happen sooner than later.

    Also consider contacting your elected representatives (i.e., members of Congress for Americans, but this also applies to citizens of other countries) and clearly stating your support for the Millennium Development Goals. The MDGs, including the one of universal primary education addressed in this series, were the promises 189 countries made several years ago–not only about education, but also hunger, child and maternal health, gender equity, and infectious disease. Unfortunately, these have suffered from a budget shortfall right from the start, and that needs to be corrected if the world is to make headway in tackling these problems. And without money, too many classrooms don’t have teachers or supplies, too many hospitals and understaffed without proper medicines, too many mothers and children die needlessly. The G-20 meets this month, and it will be a good time to reaffirm our commitment to these important goals.

  • Emma

    I feel sorry for the Indian girl’s decision. She wasted her great potenial. I’m fro mRwanda, but my parents moved to Germany where I could receive great education. Now, I’m at college here in the Uunited States. I appreciate every second and did never take education for granted. But I have to say that I haven’t seen the second par yet. Maybe she has changed her mind.

  • mariana

    I love this series, i’ve seen the 1st and 2nd part. but i still haven’t been able to see the 3rd part up here in Canada!

  • Mallory

    These are amazing videos i love them all.. im gonna watch everyone of them now! :)

  • Ashlyn

    These children are so pure and innocent. There is nothing that they’ve done to deserve the standard of life they’re living. I just have a quick quesion..is there anything i can do to help Joab and his brothers? Let alone other children across the world who are in need of supplies, clothing, or food? After watching this special there is no way how i can ignore these kids needs and cries for help.

  • Sarah

    Im a student currently living in America and learning about different cultures. I have to say this is one of the most heart tugging film i’ve watched. It gave my classmates and I a more broader persepective of the world. I am truely sorry for everyone there struggling with getting an education. Here in the US kids dread going to school but elsewhere thats all they want to do! I almost feel greedy now. You almost want to take all of them back to your place and take care of them all! Thanks to everyone who helped out on this-you dont know how meaningful it was to us children.

  • Sarah

    I am a student that currently lives in America. In school we are currently learning about the world and its different cultures. These clips made a huge impact on me and my classmates. It definetly gave us a more broader perspective of how truely hard it is for children in other countries to get an education. Thats all they want but here in the US, us kids usually dread waking up and going to school. I almost feel greedy. I just want to take every single kid home with me and take care of them forever! Thanks to everyone who helped out on these. It has definetly helped a lot of kids truely understand to respect what they have.

  • Ashlyn

    Wow what a powerful series. These kids are so pure and innocent! Their standard of living and the challenges they face day after day they don’t deserve. Joab is a strong and sharp minded kid who’s got his head in the right direction. I have high faith that he and his brothers will grow to be more than successful!

  • Aniuf

    Thank you for the video; it is very touching. Our hearts may be hardened by the tough life in the NY city, but such videos help to soften us, so that we can be more tolerant and humane.
    Sadiq, you know so much about Africa and you are very kind. I think I met you before in school…

  • Eric

    What is the name of the music played before introducing shugufa?

  • ricardo

    jefferson keep going to school and keep playing futbol

  • Heather

    Any idea when the videos will be up and running? Tried to locate them elsewhere but no avail. Would love to see the latest installment!

  • shahr

    Dear Heather,

    Here is the link: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/wideangle/episodes/time-for-school-series/full-episode-time-for-school-3/5558/
    Please note that it will only work within the U.S.

  • Vanessa

    Is there any way we can become pen pals with the students? I am asking because i am interested in talking with kids who are around my age in the other parts of the world.

  • Ken Okoth

    Dear PBS Friends — a number of people asked how they could help Joab and his siblings. Since November 2009, the Children of Kibera Foundation has been accepting restricted donations on behalf of Joab and his siblings. We need only $2500 to buy new school uniforms and books for 8th grade for Joab and his brother, and to pay for them to get extra tutoring five days a week after school. We have also been providing them with a cooked dinner each night Monday to Friday, and we send them to their humble home with something to eat for breakfast the next morning before going to school. We are a very small organization registered as a 501c3 in Washington DC, and working on the ground in Kibera. We need your help, please visit our site. So far, we have received only $300 in donations to help Joab and his siblings, and our staff bought them new shoes, food in November and December, and paid for a tutor for one month. 2010 is the final year before high school for Joab and Jared, please make a donation so you can give them the support to succeed at school. Thank you, Ken. http://www.childrenofkibera.org

  • jose

    deeeezzzz

  • yesssssss

    i feel sorry for these kids i hope obama drinks the blood of every terrorist in afghanistan!!!!!

  • ~manga_animefan

    uhh… yessss that is kinda wierd.u cant really drink terrorist blood ew. that is disgustingg. ^.^ although that would be awesome if there were no more terrorists.but then obama would be like… a vampire dude :>

  • Angered Marketing Student

    Our teacher made us watch these videos and answer 154 questions about these kids. While the videos were very interesting, and it was different to see how children live there lives, I don’t think 154 questions is that necessary. Come on, that’s 22 questions per child and each segment is barely 10 mins long!

  • Diane

    I would like to purchase this series. Please let me know how I can do that. Thank you, Diane

  • feltzr

    Thank you for your interest in the Time for School series. You can purchase Part 1 from the Films Media Group. Here is a link to their website:

    http://ffh.films.com/id/12999/Part_1_Time_for_School-The_Global_Education_Crisis.htm

    Renée Feltz
    Multimedia Producer
    Women, War & Peace Series

  • Sufi

    content not available – any reason?

  • feltzr

    Sufi, thank you for the comment. We do not have broadcast rights for this episode outside of the country. You can buy some Wide Angle episodes here: http://ffh.films.com/wideangle

  • Pirate

    I cannot help but think of the multitudes of american children that go without and get a poor education as I watch this. I have no idea why we do not and will not help those locally first. It seems way to easy to focus on people an ocean away but allow those at our back doors to suffer. Detestable if you ask me.

  • Sandra Real

    It’s very interesting. I would like to see what happend. Are ther graduated already?
    My first langiage is spanish, me gustaria saber el siguiente episodio se graduaron? alguien me mandaria alguna informacion?

  • CiCi

    Were actually learning about this program in my school. Its pretty Fasinating how Joab, Nanvi, & Others have this oppertunity to achive going to school. Im doing a report on Raluca because im fasinated on her life.

  • Wilfredo aguirre

    ooooo i live in the states and seeing how hard it is to get an education elswere it makes me appriciate all the givings we have in the U.S.A, these children are brave some would risk ther life for a better one in the futer thats true courage

  • Adam jones

    I just finished watching episode 2 of this series, Back to School, which, along with original 2002 Time for School broadcast, can be watched in their entirety online. Part 3 is coming in September. I’m really glad I watched.

    thesis help

  • judith miller

    Watching this film really makes me apppreciate the educational system here in the USA, reguardless of the complaints we hear about in the media. I am glad I had the opportunity to watch the films.

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