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Culture Canvas

A roundup of the week’s art headlines.

 
Motown guitarist and songwriter Marv Tarplin is dead at 70, via The New York TImes. Tarplin helped define the sound of Smokey Robinson and the Miracles and cowrote the hit song, “The Tracks of My Tears.”

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The Nobel Prize for Literature was awarded Thursday morning to Swedish poet Tomas Transtromer, via The Washington Post. Jeffrey Brown spoke with Don Share, senior editor of Poetry Magazine, about Transtromer’s work and prize.

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The White House has named October as National Arts and Humanities Month, via The White House.

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Arbitration hearings are beginning between Julie Taymor, the creator and former director of Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark, and the musical’s producers, via Playbill. Taymor claims she is owed hundreds of thousands of dollars in unpaid royalties from her work on the show. The show, which brought together Taymor and members of the band U2, experienced a number of difficulties in making it to the stage, including technical problems, performer injuries, weak preview responses, and a swollen budget. The NewsHour reported on the show when it opened in June.

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David Mitchell, the Broadway set designer who won Tony Awards for Annie and Barnum, “died earlier this week, via The New York Times. He was 79.

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The historic Lincoln Theatre in Washington, D.C., is requesting a $500,000 bailout to avoid closing, via The Washington Post.

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The Philadelphia Orchestra is asking for a loan in order to sustain operations through its bankruptcy proceedings, via The Philadelphia Inquirer.

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One of the street artist Banksy’s most famous works has been defaced, possibly by a rival street artist, via The Guardian.

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London’s Westminster Council has blocked an outdoor installation by Egyptian artist Moataz Nasr, who planned to cut the Kufic inscription “the people want the fall of the regime” into a lawn at Hanover Square. The council said the protests are too recent to merit a commemorative piece, via ARTINFO.

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The protests against Wall Street have become sites for performance and protest art. The Los Angeles Times takes a look at the artists of Occupy L.A.

And ARTINFO reports on political art near Wall Street. Danish artists replicated the JPMorgan executive bathroom, situating it in a Manhattan diner for public use.

The NewsHour’s Paul Solman talked to protesters this week.

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Three people are being held in connection with a $100 million heist from the Paris Museum of Modern Art, via France 24. The five paintings — by Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Ferdinand Leger and Amedeo Modigliani — are still missing.

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The California Ephemera Project, an archive of ticket stubs, menus, and other everyday items by four San Francisco organizations, is now available online, via KQED.

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Bert Jansch, a leading figure in the British folk of the ’60s, has died of cancer at 67, via The Guardian.

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Steve Martin and his band, the Steep Canyon Rangers, won award for entertainer of the year at the International Bluegrass Music Association Awards in Nashville, via The Associated Press.

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The cast of Arrested Development announced a new spinoff of the show, and an anticipated movie, via The Associated Press.

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Josephine “Jo” Raciti Forsberg, who helped develop the techniques that govern improv theater, died this week at 90, via WBEZ. She was a member of the Chicago’s Playwrights Theatre Club, the forerunner of The Second City, where she was also an early member.

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Sylvia Robinson, the singer, songwriter and record producer who formed the Sugar Hill Gang, is dead at 75, via The New York Times. She made the first commercially successful rap recording and was known as “the mother of hip-hop.”

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