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Culture Canvas

A roundup of the week’s art headlines.


This week The New Yorker printed “Exorcism,” a previously unpublished play by Eugene O’Neill. In this video, Tommy Schrider reads a speech by Ned Malloy, a character based on the troubled playwright.

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A new report says that the majority of arts funding serves a mostly wealthy, white audience, while a smaller portion supports newer art groups serving poorer, more ethnically diverse communities, via The Associated Press.

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The musicians and management of the Philadelphia Orchestra vote Thursday on a collective-bargaining agreement for their labor contract. The musicians’ union and management reached a tentative agreement earlier this week, but the Orchestra’s pension fund claims that the accord would eliminate pension benefits, via BusinessWeek.

Another standoff at the Louisville Orchestra continues, via The Louisville Courier-Journal|head.

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Two stolen Pablo Picasso paintings were found in Serbia, via the CBC.

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One of three people arrested for the burglary of paintings from the Paris Museum of Modern Art told police that he tore up the paintings and threw them in the trash, via ArtINFO|+ARTINFO%29.

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The finalists for the National Book Award have been announced, via The Los Angeles Times.

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Moscow is shutting down a portion of its metro because the noise is disrupting performances at its famous” Bolshoi Theatre”:http://www.bolshoi.ru/en/, via “Russia Today”:http://rt.com/news/prime-time/bolshoi-acoustics-moscow-metro-589/.

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Donations to New York’s Metropolitan Opera are up 50 percent, via The New York Times.

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The American Film Institute is presenting actress Shirley MacLaine with its lifetime achievement award, via The Los Angeles Times.

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As DVD sales dwindle, Hollywood studios are pushing to sell movies in the cloud, via The Globe and Mail.

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The Australian video game industry is pushing for inclusion with other creative industries who receive government support, via The Australian.

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The Mary Brogan Museum of Art and Science is hoping that attention over a painting on loan to them which may have been looted by the Nazis will mean increased donations, via The New York Times.

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Alexandra Horowitz considers the future of the footnote in the age of the e-book, via The New York Times.

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ArtNews reports on young, rising artists in China.

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Tourists pose a threat to prehistoric cave paintings in Spain. The presence of visitors heats the caves and introduces microbes that erode the pigments, via New Scientist.

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Architect Anthony J. Lumsden, whose glassy buildings influenced skylines around the world, died earlier this week at age 83, via The Los Angeles Times.

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Jagjit Singh, the singer who helped revive and popularize ghazals, a form of Persian poetry set to music, died Monday at age 70, via The New York Times.

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Ruth Currier, a principal dancer with the Limon Dance Company and later its director, died at the age of 85, via The New York Times.

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Fritz Manes, who produced more than a dozen movies with Clint Eastwood, is dead at 79, via Reuters.

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The pop pianist Roger Williams died last weekend at the age of 87, via The Washington Post. His 1955 rendition of “Autumn Leaves” was the first instrumental song to reach No. 1 on the Billboard charts.

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