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NTSB: No indication object struck derailed Amtrak train in Philadelphia

Investigators have found no radio communications indicating any object struck the windshield of the ill-fated Amtrak train that derailed in Philadelphia on Tuesday, National Traffic Safety Board officials said Sunday morning.

“We interviewed the dispatchers and we listened to the dispatch tape, and we heard no communications at all from the Amtrak engineer to the dispatch center to say that something had struck his train,” NTSB lead investigator Robert Sumwalt said during an interview with ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos on “This Week.”

The FBI was called in this weekend to investigate whether there was any link between a grapefruit-sized fracture in the window of the train that had been speeding at 106 mph at the time of the derailment.

Investigators said that while they were still trying to trace the cause of the damaged windshield, their focus remained on the train’s speed when it crashed.

Eight people were killed and more than 200 were injured, including the train’s engineer, Brandon Bastion, 32, who told investigators earlier this week that he did not remember details of the events leading up to the derailment.

Emergency workers look through the remains from the wreck of the Amtrak train that derailed in Philadelphia last week on May 13, 2015. Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters

Emergency workers look through the remains from the wreck of the Amtrak train that derailed in Philadelphia last week on May 13, 2015. Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters

Almost 20 people injured in the train crash remain in Philadelphia hospitals, five in critical condition but all expected to survive, the Associated Press reported.

Amtrak is working to comply with an emergency order to install computerized speed restriction systems on northbound trains, a company spokesman said. But it could take until the end of this year to rig the entire fleet.

Sumwalt said that trains should have been outfitted with cameras.

“I will say this, that we’ve called for inward facing video cameras for a long time, and we feel that had we had cameras, that would help to help with this investigation significantly.”

National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) spokesperson Robert Sumwalt holds the final media briefing about this week's Amtrak passenger train derailment at the Sheraton Philadelphia Society Hill Hotel on May 15, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. At least eight people were killed and more than 200 others were injured when an Amtrak train traveling from Washington, DC to New York derailed on May 12 in north Philadelphia. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)

NTSB spokesman Robert Sumwalt holds the final media briefing about this week’s Amtrak passenger train derailment in Philadelphia on May 15, 2015. Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images

Amtrak Northeast Regional Train 188 was traveling from Washington, D.C., to New York, carrying 238 commuters and five crew members when it derailed at an area of track known as Frankford Junction in the Northeast Corridor on Tuesday, the NTSB said.

Amtrak said it will restore service between Philadelphia and New York at 5:30 a.m. on Monday, with full service resuming on Tuesday.

More than 2,200 trains travel the Northeast Corridor every day, serving almost 12 million passengers per year.

According to the data from the Federal Railroad Administration, 213 passengers died in train-related accidents in the U.S. in the last 25 years, not including Tuesday’s crash.

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