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Texas gets more rain but no new damage ahead of drier forecasts

More rain fell across Texas Saturday night but caused no major new problems, after the onslaught of severe weather during the week killed dozens and prompted President Barack Obama to declare a state of emergency in the state.

About 3.5 inches of rain fell in parts of Houston and surrounding Harris County, and more than 3 inches fell in Laredo Saturday afternoon and evening, according to the National Weather Service. Still, no new evacuations were ordered or recommended — and some were even lifted — as weather forecasts predicted the rain was likely to let up this week.

At least 31 people have died in the storms that began in Texas and Oklahoma over Memorial Day weekend, and 11 were still missing Saturday, the Associated Press reported, as flood waters continued to devastate areas around Houston, Austin and San Antonio.

The bodies of two women were recovered on Saturday from the Blanco River in Hays County, the sheriff’s office said in a statement, Reuters reported, ordering autopsies to identify them.

Cattle in a pasture adjacent to FM 730 as areas flood around Boyd, Texas, on Saturday, May 30, 2015. Photo by Paul Moseley/Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Cattle in a pasture adjacent to FM 730 as areas flood around Boyd, Texas, on Saturday, May 30, 2015. Photo by Paul Moseley/Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Even though parts of the state have been suffering a moderate drought, flooding in other areas has turned streets in to rivers, destroyed homes and trapped people in cars and houses, as torrential rains have dropped trillions of gallons of water across the state for more than 10 days.

President Obama signed a disaster declaration on Friday making funds available to help rebuild areas of Harris, Hays and Van Zandt counties, where damages are already estimated to exceed tens of millions of dollars. Earlier in the week, the Texas Department of Transportation had already estimated the road and bridge damage at $35 million.

Meteorologists say enough rain has fallen in the past 30 days that it could cover the entire state of Texas with eight inches of water, making May the state’s wettest month on record, according to Texas A&M climatologists.

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