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More rain for Southeast already hit hard by widespread flooding

Parts of the Southeast already battered by record-breaking rainfall can expect more rain and flooding through Monday morning, according to the National Weather Service.

One of the areas hardest hit by the rains was Columbia, South Carolina, with up to 14 inches of rain reported to have fallen overnight, according to the Associated Press

The Mayor of South Carolina’s state capital, Columbia, declared a nighttime curfew starting at 6 p.m. on Sunday and lasting through 5 a.m. on Monday, Reuters reported.

COLUMBIA, SC - OCTOBER 4:   Residents and first responders launch boats to rescue people trapped in their homes October 4, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. South Carolina experiencied a record rainfall, with at leasrt 11.5 inches falling October 3.  (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

Residents and first responders launch boats to rescue people trapped in their homes October 4, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Tens of thousands are without power and several hundred people had to be rescued from the flood waters. There have been six weather-related deaths, the AP reported.

Flooding also closed interstate highways, including 75 miles of I-95, which connects the southeast to the northeast.

The rains came as Hurricane Joaquin, which wreaked havoc in the Bahamas on Friday and was downgraded to a Category 3 storm, moves northward, but away from making landfall in the U.S.

A view shows floodwaters partially submerging Orange Street in Georgetown, South Carolina October 4, 2015. Most major roads through the historical South Carolina city have closed due to flooding. Vast swaths of U.S. Southeast and mid-Atlantic states were grappling with heavy rains and flooding from a separate weather system which has already caused at least five deaths, washed out roads and prompted evacuations and flash flood warnings. REUTERS/Randall Hill - RTS2ZEX

A view shows floodwaters partially submerging Orange Street in Georgetown, South Carolina October 4, 2015. Most major roads through the historical South Carolina city have closed due to flooding. Photo by Randall Hill/Reuters

(L-R) Norman Beauregard, Kevin Attender and Chris Rogers of the Georgetown Fire Department, wade through flooded Front Street in Georgetown, South Carolina October 4, 2015. Most major roads through the historical South Carolina city have closed due to flooding. Vast swaths of U.S. Southeast and mid-Atlantic states were grappling with heavy rains and flooding from a separate weather system which has already caused at least five deaths, washed out roads and prompted evacuations and flash flood warnings. REUTERS/Randall Hill - RTS2ZXC

Members of the Georgetown Fire Department, wade through flooded Front Street in Georgetown, South Carolina October 4, 2015. Photo by Randall Hill/Reuters

Ammie McKnight watches the level of floodwaters in the front yard of her Orange Street home in Georgetown, South Carolina October 4, 2015. Most major roads through the historical South Carolina city have closed due to flooding. Vast swaths of U.S. Southeast and mid-Atlantic states were grappling with heavy rains and flooding from a separate weather system which has already caused at least five deaths, washed out roads and prompted evacuations and flash flood warnings. REUTERS/Randall Hill - RTS2ZBO

Ammie McKnight watches the level of floodwaters in the front yard of her Orange Street home in Georgetown, South Carolina October 4, 2015. Vast swaths of U.S. Southeast and mid-Atlantic states were grappling with heavy rains and flooding from a separate weather system which has already caused at least five deaths, washed out roads and prompted evacuations and flash flood warnings. Photo by Randall Hill/Reuters

A motorcyclist navigates through flood waters in Garden City Beach, South Carolina, October 2, 2015. Category 4 Hurricane Joaquin is now moving northward and has started bringing swells to parts of the southeastern coast of the United States, the National Hurricane Center said on Friday. REUTERS/Randall Hill - RTS2SHJ

A motorcyclist navigates through flood waters in Garden City Beach, South Carolina, October 2, 2015. Category 4 Hurricane Joaquin is now moving northward and has started bringing swells to parts of the southeastern coast of the United States, the National Hurricane Center said on Friday. Photo by Randall Hill/Reuters

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