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A "Vote Here" sign is displayed at a polling station in the Kentucky National Guard Readiness Center in Burlington, Kentucky, U.S., on Tuesday Nov. 4, 2014. After blowing opportunities to win Senate control in 2010 and 2012, several political modeling outlets found the Republican Party poised to gain the six seats needed to win the chamber, even if that outcome isn't immediately known. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Supreme Court seems wary of limiting partisan map drawing

The Supreme Court seems wary of getting federal judges involved in determining when electoral district maps are too partisan.

The high court on Tuesday was hearing more than two hours of arguments in two cases involving the issue. The first case involves North Carolina’s heavily Republican congressional map, and the second involves a map drawn by Democrats in Maryland.

In deciding the two cases the high court could come out with the first limits on partisan politics in the drawing of electoral districts. It also could ultimately decide that federal judges have no role in trying to police political mapmaking.

Democrats and Republicans eagerly await the outcome of the cases because a new round of redistricting will follow the 2020 census. The decision could help shape the makeup of Congress and state legislatures over the next decade.

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