The video for this story is not available, but you can still read the transcript below.
No image

Changing Airline Industry Faces Busiest Travel Season of the Year

The Air Transport Association expects a record 25 million people will board U.S. airline flights during the holiday weekend, which comes at a time of increased security regulations. Experts discuss how the aviation industry is handling the heavy flow of traffic.

Read the Full Transcript

  • JEFFREY BROWN:

    The holiday hustle is more of a hassle these days, with an estimated million more travelers than last year taking to the roads, the rails, and the skies, the crowded skies this week. According to the FAA, 25 million Americans will fly this Thanksgiving holiday.

  • TSA EMPLOYEE:

    If you have any liquids, gels, aerosols or creams, they must be placed in a quart-sized bag.

  • JEFFREY BROWN:

    For some travelers, it's the first trip to the airport since the Transportation Security Administration announced new bans on liquids, after a plot to blow up airliners bound for the U.S. was uncovered in London last August. The total ban was later modified to restrictions known as 3-1-1.

  • AMY KUDWA, Transportation Security Administration Spokeswoman:

    Three ounces, one quart bag, one bag per passenger. Be prepared, and get here early.

  • JEFFREY BROWN:

    The result: some confusion.

  • ALIETTE COTTIN, Traveler:

    I put a lot of stuff in my carry-on bag, and I have no idea if they're going to take it away from me.

  • JEFFREY BROWN:

    And more airport angst.

  • CHAD SARCHIO, Traveler:

    Everything is just a nuisance and frustrating nowadays, I guess, so grin and bear it.

  • CHRISTINA SARCHIO, Traveler:

    There's nothing more frustrating than getting here and not knowing what you need to dump out, what you need to throw away, what you need to check.

  • JEFFREY BROWN:

    The new rules have also led to an increase in checked luggage, and that has led to more bags being lost. The good news? Airports today, while crowded, reported mostly smooth sailing and few long delays.