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Cubans in Miami Prepare for a Post-Castro Cuba

Neither Fidel Castro nor his brother Raul has been seen in public since the temporary transfer of power more than a week ago. As the possibility of the end of Castro's regime approaches, some Cubans in Miami are optimistic while others are worried.

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  • GWEN IFILL:

    Eight days ago, Cuba's aging leader, Fidel Castro, handed over temporary power to his brother, Raul. Neither man has been seen in public since, stirring worry in some quarters and optimism in others. NewsHour correspondent Jeffrey Kaye of KCET-Los Angeles reports now from Miami on the preparations for a post-Castro Cuba.

  • JEFFREY KAYE, Reporter, KCET:

    What began as a spontaneous celebration has turned into a nightly street party along one block of Miami's Little Havana neighborhood. Cuban-Americans are cheering what they hope is the imminent death of Cuban President Fidel Castro and showing their support for political change on the island nation.

    Beyond this rally, talk of Castro's health and Cuba's future has been the hot topic among South Florida's Cuban-Americans. One place to hear some of the discussion is Miami's Maximo Gomez Park, where older Cuban exiles go for dominoes and camaraderie.

  • HENRY DIAZ, Cuban-American:

    Everybody is getting excited. Everybody want to see that guy dead, but nothing happened yet. That's the problem, all right?

  • JEFFREY KAYE:

    A younger generation of Cuban-Americans is also caught up in the enthusiasm for a post-Castro era. Pedro Gonzalez wears his national pride on his shoulder, even though he's American-born and has never stepped foot in Cuba.

    So Castro dies, and then what do you?

  • PEDRO GONZALES, Cuban-American:

    I sell the house, the cars, the boat, everything, and go back.

  • JEFFREY KAYE:

    To what?

  • PEDRO GONZALES:

    To what? To great adventure, to great — I mean, my land, you know what I mean? I mean, my country, you know what I mean?

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