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Generational Lines Reveal a Split in Texas Family’s Vote

Sen. Barack Obama is gaining support in Texas -- a state where Sen. Hillary Clinton once had a stronghold -- especially among young, Latino voters. Gewn Ifill reports on the divide between father and son Texas legislators over their choice for the Democratic nomination.

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  • JIM LEHRER:

    And speaking of the Texas primary, Gwen Ifill has the story of a Democratic family divided.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    How old were you here?

  • EDDIE LUCIO, JR., Clinton Supporter:

    There I was about eight, nine, eight — about ten? Eight to ten, somewhere in there.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Eddie Lucio, Jr., and Eddie Lucio III are as close as any father and son.

  • EDDIE LUCIO, JR.:

    That was when I was in the House of Representatives. That's in the Senate.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    And that's after you became a representative?

  • EDDIE LUCIO III, Obama Supporter:

    That's when I became a representative, and I was trying to tell my dad that that's a good bill.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Were you agreeing here?

  • EDDIE LUCIO, JR.:

    He was telling me that that was a good bill, I should vote for it.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The elder Lucio, at 62, is a Texas state senator. The younger, at only 29, a first-term Texas state representative.

  • EDDIE LUCIO III:

    We're not the only senator-representative team from an area that does that. Oftentimes some of our colleagues will go and talk to their counterpart in the Senate.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    But you're the only father-son.

  • EDDIE LUCIO III:

    We're the only father and son, yes.

  • EDDIE LUCIO, JR.:

    Yes.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Eddie the elder was one of 10 children and has 103 cousins, but the son who bears his name is the only one who chose politics.

    Are you surprised that he decided to follow in your footsteps?

  • EDDIE LUCIO, JR.:

    No, I'm not surprised, because Eddie was a natural. He was a natural in a lot of things he did.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Both are Democrats from Brownsville, a south Texas city that hugs the Rio Grande River. Hispanics make up more than 90 percent of the city's roughly 150,000 residents.

    The Lucios agree on a lot, that an anti-immigration border fence that cuts through Brownsville neighborhoods is a bad idea and that the federal government should build a local veterans hospital.

    But they do not agree on Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama.

    Your dad is a Hillary Clinton supporter?

  • EDDIE LUCIO III:

    Yes, he is.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    What did he say when you told him you were going to support Barack Obama?

  • EDDIE LUCIO III:

    To be brutally honest, you know, there was some competitiveness. We started talking about experience, and who's ready to lead the country, and who can unite the party, who can beat the Republican.

    But, you know, my dad and I are each other's biggest fans. And family always comes first. But my parents always encouraged me to go out and live my own life, to make my own decisions, to bounce back from adversity in my own way.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Little did they know.

  • EDDIE LUCIO III:

    Little did they know.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    What did you say when he told you he was going to support Senator Obama?

  • EDDIE LUCIO, JR.:

    Immediately, I told him to follow his heart. I had all kinds of flashes in my mind take place, the Kennedy years of my hopes and dreams and aspirations, of having someone we could relate to.

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