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High Tech High School Pushes Hispanic Students to Become Top Achievers

A San Diego charter high school is aiming to close the education gaps between students of immigrant families and their counterparts by motivating them to acquire business and science skills and pursue college degrees. Paul Solman offers the latest in a series of reports on this education initiative.

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  • DARRELL MCCLENDON:

    Where's your transistor? Ooh, ooh, so how is that going to work when it's in your hand and not on the board?

  • STUDENT:

    You can help me put it on.

  • DARRELL MCCLENDON:

    No, I think you already know how to do that. You told me how to do everything else on here.

  • PAUL SOLMAN, NewsHour Economics Correspondent:

    Engineering teacher Darrell McClendon won't hold Josh Huezo's hand, no matter how scared the ninth-grader is of failing. Huezo is a first-generation Mexican-American at High Tech High, a San Diego liberal arts charter school that aims to keep America atop the global economy.

  • DARRELL MCCLENDON:

    What is that called?

  • STUDENT:

    The emitter?

  • PAUL SOLMAN:

    Neither of Jose Huezo's parents went to college. But every kid here does, even though admission is strictly by lottery.

  • DARRELL MCCLENDON:

    The emitter, where's it going?

  • STUDENT:

    To the negative.

  • PAUL SOLMAN:

    Josh Huezo is learning self-confidence here and told us he plans to get a degree in business and run his own some day. High Tech High succeeds by organizing students into teams, having them work on projects. It's education as discovery: keeping students engaged in order to keep America competitive in science in the global economy.

  • DARRELL MCCLENDON:

    Yes, so where does that go?

  • STUDENT:

    To the negatives.

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