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Oprah leads Hollywood’s call to end sexual harassment

At the Golden Globe awards Sunday night, Hollywood’s biggest stars wore pins saying “Time’s Up,” a nod to a campaign to end sexual harassment in the industry. Several stars, including Oprah Winfrey, also made impassioned calls to speak up about misconduct during their acceptance speeches. Jeffrey Brown reports on the campaign, the night’s events and the momentum of the #MeToo movement.

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  • Judy Woodruff:

    Last night, Hollywood held its biggest awards ceremony since the stories of Harvey Weinstein's abuse first broke and since the #MeToo hashtag grew into a national and even international m0vement.

    There's a new anti-harassment effort in the industry known as Time's Up.

    As Jeffrey Brown reports, those sentiments were out on full view at the Golden Globes, overshadowing the awards themselves.

  • Seth Meyers:

    Good evening ladies and remaining gentlemen.

    (LAUGHTER)

  • Jeffrey Brown:

    It was a night of big stars and pointed statements. From the all-black wardrobes, to the Time's Up buttons, to the acceptance speeches, the 2018 Golden Globes centered on women's equality and empowerment.

    It follows a year in which waves of sexual misconduct allegations have rippled through Hollywood, sparking responses like the #MeToo movement.

    Some activists from the campaign even accompanied several actresses last night. Nicole Kidman set the show's early tone as she took the award for best actress in a limited TV series for her role on HBO's "Big Little Lies."

  • Nicole Kidman:

    I do believe and I hope we can elicit change through the stories we tell and the way we tell them. Let's keep the conversation alive. Let's do it.

  • Jeffrey Brown:

    One by one, actresses and filmmakers took the stage with their own messages on harassment.

  • Reese Witherspoon:

    So, I want to thank everyone who broke their silence this year and spoke up about abuse and harassment. You are so brave. Time is up. We see you, we hear you, and we will tell your stories.

  • Elisabeth Moss:

    We no longer live in the blank white spaces at the edge of print. We no longer live in the gaps between the stories. We are the story in print, and we are writing the story ourselves.

  • Jeffrey Brown:

    Frances McDormand won best actress in the motion picture drama category for her performance in "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri."

  • Frances McDormand:

    It was really great to be in this room tonight and to be part of a tectonic shift in our industry's power structure.

  • Jeffrey Brown:

    The nominations themselves even drew fire on the issue, as actress Natalie Portman presented the honor for best director in a motion picture.

  • Natalie Portman:

    And here are the all-male nominees.

    (LAUGHTER)

  • Jeffrey Brown:

    But the night's most-talked-about moment surely came from Oprah Winfrey, who accepted the Golden Globes' Cecil B. DeMille Award for career achievement.

  • Oprah Winfrey:

    So, I want tonight to express gratitude to all the women who have endured years of abuse and assault, because they, like my mother, had children to feed and bills to pay and dreams to pursue.

    For too long, women have not been heard or believed if they dared to speak their truth to the power of those men. But their time is up.

    (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • Oprah Winfrey:

    Their time is up.

    So, I want all the girls watching here now to know that a new day is on the horizon.

    (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • Oprah Winfrey:

    And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women, many of whom are right here in this room tonight, and some pretty phenomenal men, fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody ever has to say me too again.

    Thank you.

    (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • Jeffrey Brown:

    Reactions online to Oprah's speech and the show as a whole were largely positive, but some were critical.

    This morning, NBC's Megyn Kelly expressed skepticism.

  • Megyn Kelly:

    It's that industry writ large that has lectured flyover country for a long, long time about values, only to, it turns out, have a massive value problem itself. So I do wonder about the impact of last night and how great it can possibly be.

  • Jeffrey Brown:

    And as for Oprah herself, the remarks fueled speculation, and calls online, for a presidential run in 2020. Her longtime partner told The Los Angeles Times — quote — "She would absolutely do it."

    For the PBS NewsHour, I'm Jeffrey Brown.

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