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Mnangagwa, disputed winner of Zimbabwe election, urges unity

While Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa urged citizens to unite after he was named the winner of the presidential election, opponent Nelson Chamisa said he did not accept the outcome and would explore all legal means to challenge it. Mnangagwa says Chamisa has a crucial role to play in the government. John Ray of Independent Television News reports.

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  • Judy Woodruff:

    In Zimbabwe today, the man who was declared the winner of the presidential election, Emmerson Mnangagwa, urged Zimbabweans to unite, saying that his defeated rival, Nelson Chamisa, has a crucial role to play in the country's present and future.

    Mnangagwa pledged to order an investigation into the army's use of violence after the vote in which six people were killed. Opposition leader Nelson Chamisa said he did not accept the outcome and said he would explore all legal means to challenge it.

    We start with this report from John Ray of Independent Television News.

  • John Ray:

    Meet the new boss, same as the old boss. The winner of a disputed election will need more than words to convince his nation's he's changed.

  • Emmerson Mnangagwa:

    Now that the people have spoken, I hear your call. I pledge to be a listening president, a fair president, a responsible and an inclusive president.

  • John Ray:

    He said his defeated opponent would have a crucial role to play in the nation's future, though, earlier, this new Zimbabwe looked very much like the old, ugly.

    Without warning or explanation:

    Are you here to arrest us?

    Riot police raided a city center hotel in Harare where we waited to meet Mr. Chamisa.

    So they're banging on their riot shields. They're telling us we must get out. "Out, out, out," they keep shouting. It's not clear whether they have come to arrest Nelson Chamisa or just to flush the journalists away. But, as you can see, it's a very menacing and quite intimidating situation.

    We were shifted into the street. Harare's police chief apparently believed he was breaking up an opposition meeting.

    Are you here to arrest Mr. Chamisa?

  • Man:

    Did I talk to any of you??

  • John Ray:

    This is a week the authorities here claimed they had embraced democracy.

    Is this the new Zimbabwe?

    Then a government minister ordered the police to let us back in. At last, Mr. Chamisa, still claiming the election was rigged, was allowed to speak.

  • Nelson Chamisa:

    You will find that there's no jubilation, there's no celebration. If anything, today is a day of mourning, mourning over democracy. It is a black day because we are seeing a repeat of what we saw during the yesteryear regime.

  • John Ray:

    It is hard to see how this divided nation will be easily reconciled.

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