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News Wrap: DOJ announces probe into Louisville police, citing Breonna Taylor case

In our news wrap Monday, a year after police shot and killed Breonna Taylor during a raid of her home, the U.S. Justice Department is launching a full-scale review of police tactics in Louisville, Kentucky. Meanwhile, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to new arguments on the right to carry a gun in public. Then, India is in crisis as COVID-19 infections pass 350,000 a day, with more than 2,800 deaths.

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  • Judy Woodruff:

    India is in crisis tonight, as COVID-19 infections pass 350,000 a day, with more than 2,800 deaths. The Biden administration says that it will send a range of help to India and will share up to 60 million doses of AstraZeneca vaccine with other nations.

    We will return to India after the news summary.

    The U.S. Supreme Court agreed today to new arguments on the right to carry a gun in public. It will be the first such case since Justice Amy Coney Barrett gave conservatives a 6-3 majority. At issue is whether New York's gun permit law violates the Second Amendment.

    The U.S. Justice Department is launching a full-scale review of police tactics in Louisville, Kentucky. It comes a year after police shot and killed Breonna Taylor during a raid at her home.

    Chief Erika Shields said today that her force welcomes the investigation.

  • Erika Shields:

    They want to get it right. They want the community to be proud of them. And so I look at this as an opportunity to quicken the pace in which we can make those changes essential, so that the community trusts us and believes in us.

  • Judy Woodruff:

    The police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis prompted a similar Justice Department announcement last week. Such investigations were sharply curtailed during the Trump years.

    In Turkey, more than 100 people associated with a pro-Kurdish party went on trial today over mass protests in 2014. Prosecutors claim the defendants organized and incited violence. The Kurds say that it is the latest step in an ongoing crackdown on them.

    The president of Turkey today rejected President Biden's decision to label the killings of Armenians during World War I as genocide. Recep Tayyip Erdogan called the move unfounded. But he said he hopes that the two NATO allies can still work together.

  • Recep Tayyip Erdogan (through translator):

    We now need to put aside the issues that poison the relations between the two countries and look at what steps we can take from now on. Otherwise, we will have no choice but to do what is required by the level our ties have fallen to.

  • Judy Woodruff:

    All told, an estimated 1.5 million Armenians died in deportations and massacres starting in 1915. They were living in the Ottoman Empire, the precursor to what is now Turkey.

    A leaked interview with Iran's top diplomat caused a stir today. Among other things, Mohammad Javad Zarif said that Russia had wanted to stop Iran's 2015 nuclear deal. He also criticized Qasem Soleimani, the late Revolutionary Guard commander, for pressing military gains over diplomacy. Soleimani was killed in a U.S. drone strike in 2020.

    Back in this country, the Census Bureau announced that the U.S. population topped 331 million in the 2020 count. That's up 7.4 percent from the 2010 census, the second smallest increase ever. The numbers also show Republican-run states in the South and West are gaining more congressional seats. We will have a detailed look later in the program.

    And on Wall Street, blue chips slipped, but the rest of the market hit new highs. The Dow Jones industrial average lost nearly 62 points to close at 33981. The Nasdaq rose 122 points to a record close, and the S&P 500 added just seven points, but also finished at a new high.

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