News Wrap: Facebook to shut down facial recognition system, delete data

In our news wrap Tuesday, Facebook has announced it's shutting down its facial recognition system over growing privacy concerns, and has said it will delete the data by December. Yahoo is the latest tech company to leave China, citing growing restrictions. Arguments in Kyle Rittenhouse's trial in Kenosha, Wisconsin, began. He is charged with killing two men and wounding a third at a 2020 protest.

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  • Judy Woodruff:

    In the day's other news: Pfizer's COVID vaccine for young children won approval from a CDC advisory panel. The group endorsed a low-dose version for kids 5 to 11 years old. That sent the issue to CDC Director Rochelle Walensky for final approval. And, in Ethiopia today, the government declared a six-month state of emergency.

    Rebels from Tigray Province have captured key towns and are now threatening Addis Ababa, the country's capital. The U.S. is warning the rebels not to besiege the city.

    Facebook has announced that it's shutting down its facial recognition system over growing privacy concerns. The system automatically identifies users in photos and videos. The company says that it will delete the faceprints of more than one billion people by December.

    Yahoo is the latest tech company to leave China, citing growing restrictions. Government censors had already blocked many of Yahoo's services. The professional networking site LinkedIn shut down its operations in China last month.

    Lawyers in Kenosha, Wisconsin, began making their cases today in the trial of Kyle Rittenhouse. He is charged with killing two men and wounding a third amid protests and violence after police shot a Black man in 2020. Prosecution and defense depicted Rittenhouse as either acting to protect himself, or looking for trouble, as they made opening statements.

  • Thomas Binger, Kenosha County Assistant District Attorney:

    The evidence will show that hundreds of people were out on the street experiencing chaos and violence, and the only person who killed anyone was the defendant, Kyle Rittenhouse.

  • Mark Richards, Attorney For Kyle Rittenhouse:

    It isn't a whodunit, when did it happen, or anything like that. It is, was Kyle Rittenhouse's actions privileged under the law of self-defense?

  • Judy Woodruff:

    Rittenhouse is now 18. If convicted, he could face life in prison.

    The U.S. Justice Department sued today to block a giant merger in book publishing. Penguin Random House, the nation's largest publisher, wants to buy Simon & Schuster for $2.2 billion. The suit says the new company would have too much power, hurting authors and readers.

    And on Wall Street, all three major indexes set records again. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 138 points to close above 36000 for the first time. The Nasdaq rose 53. The S&P 500 added 17.

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