News Wrap: Fourth student dies after Michigan school shooting, suspect charged with murder

In our news wrap Wednesday, a fourth student died of wounds from Tuesday's school shooting in Michigan. The suspect — 15-year-old Ethan Crumbley — was charged with murder and terrorism. Published reports said former President Trump tested positive for COVID three days before his first debate with Democratic rival Joe Biden. Russia ordered a number of U.S. diplomats to leave the country by Jan. 31.

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  • Judy Woodruff:

    In the day's other news: A fourth student died of wounds from Tuesday's school shooting in Michigan. Hours later, the suspect, 15-year-old Ethan Crumbley, was charged with murder and terrorism. He was arraigned via video link this afternoon.

    Authorities said he talked about killing students in a recording Monday night, after he had trouble at school.

  • Michael Bouchard, Oakland County, Michigan, Sheriff:

    The schools did have contact with the student the day before and the day of the shooting for behavior in the classroom that they felt was concerning.

    In fact, the parents were brought in the morning of the shooting and had a face-to-face meeting with the school.

  • Judy Woodruff:

    The teen was ordered held without bond. The prosecutor said his parents may also face charges.

    Published reports today said former President Trump tested positive for COVID three days before his first debate with Democratic rival Joe Biden in 2020. That was six days before the White House announced he was sick. The reports stem from an account by Mark Meadows, who was then the White House of chief staff. Mr. Trump today called it — quote — "fake news."

    In political transitions, Atlanta City Councilman Andre Dickens will be the new mayor. He won a Tuesday run-off after a campaign dominated by the issues of crime and affordable housing.

    And Oregon Congressman Peter DeFazio became the 19th Democrat to announce that he will retire from the U.S. House of Representatives after next year. He is 74 and was first elected in 1986.

    Russia has ordered a number of U.S. diplomats to leave the country by January 31. The move affects U.S. Embassy staff who've been in Russia for more than three years. It follows a U.S. order for 54 Russian diplomats to go home in the next six months.

    The women's pro tennis tour, the WTA, is suspending all tournaments in China over concerns about the player Peng Shuai. She has largely dropped out of view after accusing a former government official of sexual assault. The WTA said today that there's still serious doubt that Peng is safe and free of government coercion.

    Back in this country, President Biden predicted today that store shelves would be well-stocked for the holidays, and he said that inflation will cool as pandemic disruptions ease.

    But, at a congressional hearing, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said it's not certain that prices will ease in the second half of next year.

  • Jerome Powell, Federal Reserve Chairman:

    We can't act as though we're sure of that. We're not at all sure of that. Inflation has been more persistent and higher than we have expected. And we have to use our policy to address the plausible — the range of plausible outcomes.

  • Judy Woodruff:

    At the same hearing, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen rejected Republican claims that pandemic relief spending has fueled inflation.

    And on Wall Street, worries about the new COVID variant wiped out early gains. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 461 points, to close at 34022. The Nasdaq fell 283 points, nearly 2 percent. The S&P 500 dropped 54.

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