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Newsman Roger Mudd Reflects on ‘Glory Days of Television News’

In his new book, "The Place to Be", veteran television news journalist and former NewsHour correspondent Roger Mudd describes more than 20 years working in the Washington bureau of CBS News and assesses the future of the television news business.

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  • GWEN IFILL:

    Finally tonight, Jeffrey Brown has our conversation with newsman — and, among other things, former NewsHour correspondent — Roger Mudd.

  • ROGER MUDD, Television Journalist:

    It was just a year ago this afternoon, 4:46 precisely, that the second session of the 87th Congress adjourned for good.

  • JEFFREY BROWN:

    For 19 years, beginning in 1961, Roger Mudd was a familiar face in millions of American households as a correspondent for CBS News, covering Congress….

  • ROGER MUDD:

    This is Roger Mudd at the U.S. Capitol.

  • JEFFREY BROWN:

    … national election campaigns…

  • ROGER MUDD:

    Why do you want to be president?

  • TV ANNOUNCER:

    This is the "CBS Evening News" with Roger Mudd…

  • JEFFREY BROWN:

    … and serving as primary substitute for anchor Walter Cronkite.

  • ROGER MUDD:

    Good evening.

  • JEFFREY BROWN:

    Mudd began his career in 1953 as a newspaper reporter at the Richmond, Virginia, News Leader, before switching to radio and then TV. He left CBS in 1980 when Dan Rather was chosen to succeed Cronkite and became co-anchor of the rival "NBC Nightly News."

    He later spent five years with us at the NewsHour and served as documentary host at The History Channel until 2004.

    Now, in a new memoir, "The Place to Be," Roger has written of the excitement and turbulence of his days in the CBS Washington bureau.

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