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Photos: The morning after in Scotland

Scottish citizens awoke today — if they ever went to bed at all — to the news that their country will remain part of the United Kingdom.

A record-breaking 85 percent of registered voters turned out at the polls Thursday to cast their ballots for or against independence, the Associated Press reports. This included a number of voters under the age of 18 — the referendum was the first time individuals as young as 16 were permitted to vote on a major matter of state in the United Kingdom. The majority of residents, 55 percent, voted against independence, while 45 percent voted for it.

Pro-independence supporters console each other in George Square in Glasgow, Scotland, on September 19, 2014, following a defeat in the referendum on Scottish independence. Scotland rejected independence on Friday in a referendum that left the centuries-old United Kingdom intact but paved the way for a major transfer of powers away from London.  AFP PHOTO / ANDY BUCHANAN (Photo credit should read Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Images)

And the agony: Pro-independence supporters console each other in George Square in Glasgow following a defeat in the referendum on Scottish independence. Photo by Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Images

EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 19:  Dejected Yes vote campaigners make their way home along the Royal Mile after the people of Scotland voted no to independence on September 19, 2014 in Edinburgh, Scotland. The majority of Scottish people have today voted 'No' in the referendum and Scotland will remain within the historic union of countries that make up the United Kingdom.  (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Dejected “Yes” vote campaigners make their way home along the Royal Mile in Edinburgh. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

Across the nation, independence-seekers mourned their loss. The leader of the Yes Scotland movement, Alex Salmond, announced today that he will resign his position as Scotland’s first minister and the leader of the Scottish National Party, which has championed independence for decades.

“We lost the referendum vote but can still carry the political initiative. More importantly Scotland can still emerge as the real winner,” Salmond said at the time of his resignation.

Pro-Union supporters celebrate following the announcement of referendum polling results during a 'Better Together' event in Glasgow, Scotland, on September 19, 2014. Scotland's First Minister Alex Salmond on Friday conceded defeat in his party's campaign for independence from the rest of the United Kingdom, after all but one result from the historic referendum was declared.  AFP PHOTO / ANDY BUCHANAN (Photo credit should read Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Images)

Pro-Union supporters celebrate following the announcement of referendum polling results during a ‘Better Together’ event in Glasgow. Photo by Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Images

Meanwhile, those who voted to remain part of the United Kingdom celebrated the results. In a victory speech, Alistair Darling, leader of the Better Together movement said, “The people of Scotland have spoken. We have chosen unity over division, positive change rather than needless separation.” However, he did not discount the need for political change, adding, “Every political party must listen to (the) cry for change, which could be echoed in every part of our United Kingdom but had this opportunity to express itself in Scotland.”

British prime minister David Cameron repeated this sentiment, saying the results were “clearly not a vote against change.”

The political fallout remains to be seen, but individual reactions can be seen across the nation and around the web.

The UK’s Telegraph has been live blogging from the time the polls opened. At 4 p.m. local time they reported on the referendum’s impact in the world of sports:

Fans of Scotland’s national football team have decided there is little point in singing Flower of Scotland, their anthem, at Ibrox. One Scotland fan pointed out: “How can we possibly sing Flower of Scotland when it contains the ridiculous line of ‘But we can still rise now and be the nation again’?” Another admitted: “The anthem is completely redundant now.”

Revelers wrapped in a St Andrew's or Saltire flag, the national flag of Scotland, sit on a bench following Scottish independence referendum result night celebrations in George Square in Glasgow, U.K., on Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. Scotland voted to remain in the U.K. after an independence referendum that put the future of the 307-year-old union on a knife edge and risked years of political and financial turmoil. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Revelers wrapped in the national flag of Scotland sit on a bench following the announcement of the referendum result in George Square in Glasgow. Photo by Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The news organization also reported that The Scotch Whisky Association welcomes the “stability” brought by the referendum result.

A woman shows signs of fatigue as she counts ballot cards at the Royal Highland Centre counting hall in Edinburgh, Scotland on September 19, 2014, after ballot counting got underway in the referendum on Scottish independence. In counting centres, jam-packed pubs and living rooms across Scotland, voters were nervously waiting for the results of their historic vote on whether or not to leave the United Kingdom. AFP PHOTO/LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)

A woman shows signs of fatigue as she counts ballot cards at the Royal Highland Centre in Edinburgh. Photo by Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

Twitter was a buzz with cheeky memes featuring Mel Gibson as the Scottish hero “Braveheart” and photos of sad Scots wrapped in the Scottish flag:

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