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Flannery O’Connor biographical timeline

Flannery O’Connor. Photo courtesy of: Emory University.

 

March 25, 1925

Mary Flannery is the first and only child born to Edward Francis and Regina O'Connor in Savannah, Georgia.

March 25, 1925
PHOTO: Flannery O'Connor, Age 5. Photo courtesy of: Emory University.
1930

Pathé News film features O'Connor and the chicken that she taught to walk backwards.

1930
PHOTO: Flannery O'Connor with chickens. Photo courtesy of: Emory University.
1938

O'Connor’s family moves to Milledgeville, Georgia where she attends Peabody Girls High School. O’Connor creates funny picture books, such as “Mistaken Identity” about geese and gender confusion.

1938
PHOTO: 'Mistaken Identity.' Photo courtesy of: Emory University.
1941

Edward O’Connor dies from lupus complications. Mary Flannery is 15 years old.

1941
PHOTO: Edward O'Connor, 1930. Photo courtesy of: Emory University.
1942-45

Mary Flannery O’Connor attends Georgia State College for Women where she draws cartoons while editing the campus newspaper and the literary magazine. She shortens her name to simply Flannery.

1942-45
PHOTO: Photo courtesy of: Emory University.
1945-47

O’Connor begins graduate school in journalism at the University of Iowa, but quickly shifts to the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, receiving an MFA supervised by Professor Paul Engle. In 1946 she publishes her first piece of fiction, "The Geranium," in Accent magazine.

1945-47
PHOTO: Photo courtesy of: Emory University.
1948-49

O'Connor is invited to the artist's colony, "Yaddo" in Sarasota Springs, New York, where she continues work on her first novel, Wise Blood. Due to controversy, she moves briefly to New York City and then to Robert and Sally Fitzgerald’s home in Ridgefield, CT.

1948-49
PHOTO: Photo courtesy of: Emory University.
1950

Not feeling well, O'Connor returns to Georgia where she is diagnosed with disseminated lupus erythematosus. Because of her illness, O'Connor and her mother Regina move to the family farm north of Milledgeville, that she names "Andalusia."

1950
PHOTO: Photo courtesy of: Emory University.
1952-53

O'Connor's first novel, "Wise Blood," is published by Harcourt, Brace & Co. and met with tough reviews. She completes "The River” and "The Life You Save May Be Your Own," which is published in "Prize Stories 1954: The O. Henry Awards."

1952-53
PHOTO: Photo courtesy of: Emory University.
1955

Flannery O'Connor's collection, "A Good Man Is Hard To Find and Other Stories" is published to great acclaim. O’Connor is interviewed on NBC’s Galley Proof by Harvey Breit.

1955
PHOTO: Photo courtesy of: Emory University.
1957

A film adaptation of O'Connor's story "The Life You Save May Be Your Own" starring Gene Kelly is released for television.

1957
1958

O'Connor travels to Europe as part of a Lourdes Pilgrimage. She has a personal audience with Pope Pius XII in Rome.

1958
PHOTO: Graphic by Heidi Kumao.
1964

Doctors inform O'Connor her anemia is caused by a fibroid tumor and needs surgery. She continues to revise "Revelation" while in the hospital, hiding drafts under her pillow. The surgery reactivates her lupus. She grows weaker from post-surgery infections. O’Connor is readmitted to Baldwin County Hospital, falls into a coma, and dies early on Aug. 3rd. At age 39, O’Connor is buried next to her father in Milledgeville on Aug. 4th.

1964
PHOTO: Graphic by Heidi Kumao.
1965

O'Connor's second published short story collection, entitled "Everything That Rises Must Converge" is released by Farrar, Strauss and Giroux in April.

1965
PHOTO: "Everything That Rises Must Converge" cover.
1971

"The Complete Stories of Flannery O’Connor" is published and is posthumously awarded the National Book Award.

1971
1979

John Huston directs an adaptation of "Wise Blood," written and produced by the Fitzgerald sons, Michael and Benedict.

1979
PHOTO: Wise Blood, 1979.

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