Special | Australia Wildfires: A NATURE Special Report - Feeding a Rescued Joey

Adrina is a wildlife carer who has turned her rural home into a koala sanctuary. She has been nursing multiple burnt kangaroos since the fires broke out.

Transcript Print

- Oh, look how sweet.

(melancholy music) (volunteers murmuring directions among themselves) - [Speaker Blue Gloves] So this one yesterday, the toenail actually came off yesterday, didn't it, the toe?

- [Speaker Navy Jacket] Yeah, off this lateral one.

And then we're just concerned about the nails.

If they loose the nails on the big middle toes... - [Speaker Blue Gloves] This one, then they can't really hop.

- [Speaker Navy Jacket] They can't really do what they need to do.

- [Speaker Blue Gloves] This one's really sore.

- Here you are, little one.

Very nicely, little one.

- You're not too frightened.

She likes you.

- She likes to get in the bag, didn't you?

- [Anja] So you've got hopes that this one will be released?

- [Adrina] Yeah, I do.

I hope for all of them to be released.

But the problem with burns, you don't know for weeks down the track whether they actually gonna be releasable or not.

So you have, there's a lot of work that goes into them.

- Doesn't look like in too much pain.

- No, she's quite, I think she's quite comfortable.

'Cause she's feeding so nicely and she's moving around quite happily, it shows me that she's probably quite comfortable.

- [Anja] Here at the rescue center you're basically feeding these joeys and keeping them going until their burns heal.

- Well, it'll be longer because these guys are too little, they're still dependent on their parents, on their mom, for milk.

I will still be doing that.

They look like they're too big to be in the pouch.

Actually, if they're no longer getting in the pouch, they'll actually put their head in the pouch and drink milk.

And mom is teaching them lots of skills and food that they should be eating and all that sort of stuff so they're quite dependent on the parent and the mob that they're in.

So these guys will stay with me 'til they're probably about 18 months old and then we can release some.

And then we just support them for a few weeks 'til they find their way around.

- [Anja] So she seems like she's doing well?

- She's doing quite well.

(rushing wind sound)