THE 30 SECOND CANDIDATE HISTORICAL TIMELINEFROM IDEA TO ADTRICKS OF THE TRADEQ_AND_ATHE TELEVISION PROGRAM
Wisconsin Public Television
     

         
1996  
   
video  

Bill Clinton made extensive use of comparison spots to differentiate his agenda from that of Bob Dole. Ads itemized a number of issues spelling out Clinton's and Dole's positions.

Kathleen Hall Jamieson had this analysis: "In 1996, it's important to know that Dole and Clinton differ on the minimum wage, that Dole and Clinton differ on family medical leave. Those are important distinctions. You learn about those distinctions in the Clinton ads. You might, by the way, learn those distinctions and say 'Given my philosophical predispositions, I want to favor Dole because I'm on Dole's side of the argument,' but at least you have the ability to say 'There is a difference here.'"

The distinctions between Clinton and Dole are reinforced by visual style, with Dole put in black and white.

Again, Kathleen Hall Jamieson's analysis: "The visual techniques were designed to make Dole seem old and outdated. And so the move to black and white and the move to more grainy images in the past was a way of signaling 'old and out-of-fashion' without ever saying it."

   
       
   

WATCH A CLINTON AD --- Quicktime or RealVideo

   

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