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The Spirit of Living Things
 
Migo
Marmot
Yak
Bharal
Elephant
Lammergeir Vulture
Takin
Snow Leopard
Red Panda
Black Crane
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Tiger
Golden Langurs
Drongo
Asiatic Buffalo
Hornbill
Red Fox
Wolf
Black Bear
Musk Deer
Serow
Otters
Birds
Reptiles
SnakeReptiles and Amphibians

Amphibians, like frogs and toads, occur primarily in the tropical zone and the warmer, lower temperate forest belts, although some live in hot springs at incredibly high altitudes. Hard to spot but definitely in existence in Bhutan are the Himalayan rock lizard; the Agama (males have orange heads with bright blue throats); the long legged Japalura lizard of brushy slopes; and the skink species, which holds the record for being the highest lizard in the world (found at 18,000 feet). In the humid lowlands, one can find snakes. Typical snakes include the rat snakes and racers, which are fast moving with large eyes, slender necks and broad heads; water snakes; and the mountain pit vipers, which are uniformly dark with triangular heads. Most of the snakes are non-Reptiles and Amphibianspoisonous. The cobra is occasionally encountered at lower altitudes. The only other venomous species are pit vipers, which are rare and not often seen. Reptiles and amphibians have not been extensively studied in Bhutan, and it is likely that many species thrive there.


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