Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS

Reader's Digest World Presents The Living Edens Bhutan, The last Shangri-la
 
Migo
Marmot
Yak
Bharal
Elephant
Lammergeir Vulture
Takin
Snow Leopard
Red Panda
Black Crane
Rhino
Tiger
Golden Langurs
Drongo
Asiatic Buffalo
Hornbill
Red Fox
Wolf
Black Bear
Musk Deer
Serow
Otters
Birds
Reptiles
YakYak

Since yaks cannot survive below 3,500 meters (10,500 feet), they are found at higher altitudes, usually above 4,500 meters (12,500 feet) and sometimes, as high as 6,100 meters (18,300 feet). Unique hemoglobin in the yak's blood may have assisted the creature in adapting to high altitudes. Yaks are rather large creatures, standing nearly 6 feet tall at the shoulder, with male adults weighing over a ton. Females of the species tend to weigh about a third of that. An endangered species, yaks are not helped by the fact that they bear only one young after a nine month gestation period, and that baby yaks need a full year to ween before they can survive on their own. Domesticated in Tibet in the first millennium B.C., yaks are kept in herds by nomadic Bhutanese herdsmen.
Yak

Home

Filming Shangri-La | Land of the Thunder Dragon | Animal Archive | People, Culture, History
Bhutan Resources | Teaching Bhutan | Bhutan Screen Saver | Bhutan Credits