Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS

Reader's Digest World Presents The Living Edens Bhutan, The last Shangri-la
 
Migo
Marmot
Yak
Bharal
Elephant
Lammergeir Vulture
Takin
Snow Leopard
Red Panda
Black Crane
Rhino
Tiger
Golden Langurs
Drongo
Asiatic Buffalo
Hornbill
Red Fox
Wolf
Black Bear
Musk Deer
Serow
Otters
Birds
Reptiles
The Rhino Rhino
As a species, the rhino has suffered severely because of an almost mystical faith that some Asian peoples place in medicines contained in the Rhino horn. Only 17,000 Indian, 500 Sumatran, and a scarce 70 Javan rhinos -- the rarest in world -- remain. In light of the fact that the rhino dominated the world for almost 150 million years, this is an incredible decline.

Like other subspecies, Asian rhinos -- those found in Bhutan -- reside in water a good portion of the time. Water protects the animals from bloodsucking insect pests and the oppressive heat of the day. The mud that later forms makes a dry coat on their hides that serves to protect them. They graze mainly on grasses and other aquatic plants, many of which are submerged. To get at a plant below the surface, the rhino submerges its head, pulls a plant out by the roots, and lifts its head out of the water to chew and swallow its newly grasped meal.

RhinoLarge animals that can measure up to 12 feet in length and weight over two tons, rhinos are renowned for their horns. A rhino's horn is actually a form of agglutinated hair. If removed or broken off, a rhino's horn will re-grow.


Home

Filming Shangri-La | Land of the Thunder Dragon | Animal Archive | People, Culture, History
Bhutan Resources | Teaching Bhutan | Bhutan Screen Saver | Related Links | Bhutan Credits