Frontline World

COLOMBIA - The Pipeline War, November, 2002



THE STORY
Synopsis of "The Pipeline War"


CHARTING THE WORLD'S OIL
Interactive Map of Global Oil


WHO'S WHO
Context for the Pipeline War


PHOTO ESSAY
Civilians Caught in the Crossfire


U.S. CORPORATE INTERESTS
Occidental Petroleum, BP, and more


FACTS & STATS
Learn More about Colombia


LINKS & RESOURCES
Human Rights, Colombia's Civil War, Media Resources


MAP


REACT TO THIS STORY

   


While the United States consumes roughly 19 million barrels of oil a day, mostly to power its 200 million automobiles, it produces only about 8 million barrels (or 42 percent) of that total domestically. The other 58 percent -- some 11 million barrels a day -- of our oil has to be imported from other countries.

Although the Middle East remains a principal oil supplier for the U.S. market, in recent decades other parts of the world -- West Africa and Central and South America -- have become vitally important as sources of petroleum. Today, three non-Middle East nations -- Mexico, Venezuela and Nigeria -- combine to provide the United States with almost as much oil as the Persian Gulf region provides. But overall world oil reserves outside of the Middle East appear to be limited, so over the longer term, the United States expects to remain deeply dependent on oil from the Persian Gulf.

Meanwhile, the global demand for oil is growing all over the world, with India, China and South Korea in particular fueling recent sharp increases in demand. This means that inevitably there will be greater competition among nations for what is by any measure a diminishing world oil supply. This is one reason underlying the strategic deployment of U.S. military resources in and around the Middle East.

The interactive chart above summarizes key aspects of the current global oil business.

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All research for "Charting the World's Oil" feature conducted by David Montero. Montero is a freelance reporter based in San Francisco, California.

Producer: Angela Morgenstern; Designed by: Susan Harris, Fluent Studios; see full web credits.