Frontline World

COLOMBIA - The Pipeline War, November, 2002



THE STORY
Synopsis of "The Pipeline War"


CHARTING THE WORLD'S OIL
Interactive Map of Global Oil


WHO'S WHO
Context for the Pipeline War


PHOTO ESSAY
Civilians Caught in the Crossfire


U.S. CORPORATE INTERESTS
Occidental Petroleum, BP, and more


FACTS & STATS
Learn More about Colombia


LINKS & RESOURCES
Human Rights, Colombia's Civil War, Media Resources


MAP


REACT TO THIS STORY

   


Photo Essay: Civilians Caught in the Crossfire
In Colombia, oil resources are only one reason for the ongoing armed conflict. The Colombian military and the paramilitaries also battle guerrillas over the control of coca-producing regions that provide 90 percent of the cocaine reaching the United States. Civilians account for up to 75 percent of the conflict's victims.

 

A young herdsman in the southern Colombian town of La Macarena, an area held by rebels until recently. Approximately 40 percent of the Colombian countryside is under the control of leftist groups.

Downtown Puerto Asis, the largest town in southern Colombia's Putumayo region where most of the world's coca is grown. Both FARC guerrillas and AUC paramilitaries operate in and around Puerto Asis.

A small coca plantation 60 miles outside of Puerto Asis. Many of Colombia's coca plots are operated by farmers who can no longer sustain themselves with legal crops.

A fighter of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) at a guerrilla roadblock on a highway near San Vicente in southern Colombia.

FARC guerrillas stand guard at a checkpoint on the road to Los Posos, site of failed peace talks between the rebels and Colombian government.

Paramilitary fighters of the United Autodefenses of Colombia (AUC) patrol Colombia's southern Putumayo department. Putumayo is the coca?growing capital of the world, a landscape hotly contested by leftist guerrillas and the right-wing AUC.

Fighters of the right-wing United Autodefenses of Colombia (AUC) at a camp in Putumayo, southern Colombia.

Government soldiers of the antiguerrilla battalion leave a combat zone in southern Colombia after fighting with FARC rebels.

 

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