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News Wrap: Obama visits Omaha after State of the Union

January 13, 2016 at 6:50 PM EDT
File photo of President Barack Obama boarding Air Force One by Carlos Barria/Reuters
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JUDY WOODRUFF: Good evening. I’m Judy Woodruff. Gwen Ifill is away.

On the “NewsHour” tonight: Ten U.S. sailors are freed after being detained overnight by Iran’s Revolutionary Guard, but questions surround the incident.

Then: After President Obama’s final State of the Union, we turn the corner to the 2016 race and talk to three reporters on the trail.

And, in light of recent attacks on German citizens, Chancellor Angela Merkel faces criticism for her open-door refugee policy.

PETER PAULS, Editor, Kolner Stadt Anzeiger: I think the major issue is not the political surface that we are looking on. It is what is going on in the population.

JUDY WOODRUFF: Plus: The first Chilean to win architecture’s highest award focuses on improving spaces for urban slums around the world.

All that and more on tonight’s “PBS NewsHour.”

(BREAK)

JUDY WOODRUFF: Wall Street took a beating today, in the face of growing worries about slumping oil prices, a slowdown in China and global growth.

The Dow Jones industrial average lost almost 365 points to close near 16150. The Nasdaq fell nearly 160 points, and the S&P 500 index dropped 48 into what Wall Street calls a correction, a decline of 10 percent or more from a recent peak.

It lasted less than 24 hours. Iran’s seizure of two U.S. Navy boats, and their 10 crew members, ended today in the Persian Gulf. They’d been held on Farsi Island after one of the boats had what U.S. officials called mechanical trouble en route from Kuwait to Bahrain. We will have a full report on the incident after the news summary.

President Obama hit the road today to sell his State of the Union message of American strength and to appeal for unity. He began with a visit to Omaha, Nebraska, a majority-Republican, red state. He’s asking Republicans in Congress to help pass an Asian trade deal and to address heroin addiction.

In Pakistan, a suicide bombing killed at least 15 people today and wounded dozens more outside a polio vaccination center. The attack in the city of Quetta came as health workers were about to kick off a three-day immunization campaign. Most of those killed were policemen assigned to escort the vaccination teams. But local officials vowed to continue efforts to eradicate the disease.

ANWAR-UL-HAQ KAKAR, Spokesman, Government of Balochistan (through interpreter): I, on behalf of the government, want to assure the whole province and the whole country that we will not retreat a single step in this war, not under any circumstances. The polio campaign will continue in the province nonstop and without any interruption. We will try to even make it faster by increasing our resources.

JUDY WOODRUFF: Two Taliban groups, one with ties to the Islamic State group, claimed responsibility for the attack.

Police in Turkey have arrested five people in a deadly suicide bombing in Istanbul. The attack yesterday killed 10 Germans in the city’s main tourist district. Germany’s interior minister, along with Turkey’s prime minister, visited the wounded in Istanbul today. The German official said there’s no reason for tourists to avoid visiting Turkey.

U.N. plans for Syrian peace talks suffered a setback today. The talks are supposed to start January 25. But the Western-backed Free Syrian Army and other factions now say they won’t take part. They said, first, the Syrian government must let relief into besieged towns.

And back in this country, people snapped up last-minute tickets for tonight’s Powerball lottery drawing and the largest jackpot ever. Record-breaking ticket sales have helped push the top prize to $1.5 billion. In some places today, people waited hours on end for a chance to play. The odds of winning are one in more than 292 million.

Still to come on the “NewsHour”: the crisis that didn’t happen, American sailors released by Iran; politics mixes with the president’s legacy; a former NRA chief on the nation’s gun policy; and much more.

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