Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS
Antiques Roadshow FYI | Behind every treasure lies a story ... Wednesday at 8:00pm on PBS
Antiques Roadshow FYIAbout the SeriesRoadshow UpdatesTipsMissing MasterpiecesFeaturesForumFYI

Program Highlights

Program 101 | Premiered Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2005

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW FYI, a new magazine-style series from the producers of ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, premieres Wednesday, January 19, 2005, at 8pm ET on PBS (check local listings). Hosted by Lara Spencer, with correspondent Clay Reynolds, ROADSHOW FYI's lively mix of appraisal updates, antiques and collectibles features, trade secrets, and tips appeals to the avid antiques buff and merely curious alike. In the series' first episode, the owner of a rare Beatles album cover — originally appraised at ANTIQUES ROADSHOW in Chicago for $10,000 to $12,000 — tells Clay Reynolds what happened after ROADSHOW left town; appraiser J. Michael Flanigan shows viewers how to shop smart at the famed Brimfield Antiques Show in Brimfield, Massachusetts; expert David Lackey shares the secrets of detecting damage on ceramics; Clay gets a crash course in antique stove restoration, and appraiser Rudy Franchi reveals why the hunt for a long-lost movie poster has become his grand obsession.

Check local listings

Program 102 | Premiered Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2005

Twin rocking chairs — separated for generations — are brought together at a tearful family reunion on ANTIQUES ROADSHOW FYI, thanks to an ANTIQUES ROADSHOW appraisal in Indianapolis that valued a single chair at $18,000 to $20,000. Later, correspondent Clay Reynolds watches the bidding get fast and furious at the Sotheby's auction of items from the Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash estate, while appraiser David Rago helps decode the auction process from the sidelines. Expert Ken Farmer describes how to put together a basic appraisal toolkit, and appraiser Nick Dawes relates the tale of a missing Rene Lalique masterpiece — the famous jewelry maker's first glass vase, crafted in 1898, and last seen at the artist's centennial exhibition in 1900.

Check local listings

Program 103 | Premiered Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2005

Correspondent Clay Reynolds catches up with the owner of a Tiffany lamp, appraised at ANTIQUES ROADSHOW in Chicago for $25,000 to $35,000. Appraiser Rudy Franchi is on hand for the recovery of vintage lobby cards once used as wallboard in an attic; expert Stuart Whitehurst explains how to tell the difference between ivory and bone — without first looking at the price tag; jewelry expert Barry Weber visits a gem testing lab where a broach found on ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is finally authenticated; and appraiser J. Michael Flanigan puts out an All Points Bulletin for a suite of furniture last seen at the White House on August 24, 1814 — the day the British burned down Washington, DC.

Check local listings

Program 104 | Premiered Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2005

It's the week before Valentine's Day and already love is in the air on ANTIQUES ROADSHOW FYI. Correspondent Clay Reynolds reports from Colonial Williamsburg on the disposition of an eighteenth century American wedding dress appraised on ANTIQUES ROADSHOW in Savannah for $6,000 to $8,000. Expert Katherine Kreider shows why Valentine's Day cards have won the hearts of generations of collectors; Clay gets pointers from author Barbara Israel on transforming a garden with antiques; appraiser Karen Keane explores the connection between scrimshaw and romance; and expert Chris Coover details the search for love letters between George and Martha Washington, once thought to have been destroyed.

Check local listings

This Week's Highlight: Program 105 | Premiered Wednesday, Feb. 16, 2005

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW FYI correspondent Clay Reynolds discovers what happened to an 1822 first edition Carey American Atlas after it was appraised on ANTIQUES ROADSHOW in Chicago for $8,000 to $12,000. Host Lara Spencer gets a lesson in Delft tile collecting from appraiser Suzanne Perrault. Clay follows the emotional story of a World War II pilot as he visits a fleet of restored "warbirds"; learns from expert Bruce Herman what's hot in World War II aviation collectibles; and interviews appraiser Alan Fausel about the astonishing true story of an art heist at a San Francisco museum — and equally incredible recovery — involving an original Rembrandt.

Check local listings

Program 106 | Premiered Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2005

The owner of an Italian mosaic table — appraised for $5,000 to $7,000 at ANTIQUES ROADSHOW's first Portland, Oregon event in 1998 — tells correspondent Clay Reynolds what happened to his original $1,000 investment; Clay visits an Automobile Club of America show where collectors proudly display examples of mid-20th-century automotive innovation; decorative arts expert Nick Dawes explains why color matters when it comes to pricing ceramics and glass; Clay visits Chicago's Intuit Show of Folk and Outsider Art for an up-close look at the eccentric, outrageous, and highly prized art form and a conversation with self-taught artist Derek Webster; and appraiser Thomas Lecky tells the tantalizing tale of the long lost seventeenth-century Oath of the Freeman — the first document printed in the New World and worth millions if found.

Check local listings

Program 107 | Premiered Wednesday, Mar. 2, 2005

Correspondent Clay Reynolds learns how a set of illustrations by Mildred Boyle, of Little House on the Prairie fame — appraised at ANTIQUES ROADSHOW in Boston for $6,000 to $8,000 — found their way back home. Then it's off to a parade where big wheels keep on turning — antiques bicycle wheels, that is — and Clay learns the finer points of collecting these pedal-powered machines. Appraiser Rosalie Sayyah shows Clay how to care for rhinestone jewelry. Then, Clay's off to visit Andreas Brown, proprietor of New York's Gotham Bookmart, for a conversation about the late Edward Gorey, eccentric illustrator, author and award-winning set designer, whose droll, gothic-themed materials are much sought after by collectors. Lastly, expert David Bonsey tells the tale of one of the FBI's most-wanted Stradivarius violins, still missing 25 years after it was stolen following a concert in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Check local listings

Program 108 | Premiered Wednesday, Mar. 30, 2005

Correspondent Clay Reynolds catches up with the owner of a prized oil painting by artist Birger Sandzen, appraised at the Seattle ROADSHOW in 2002 for $30,000 to $50,000, and discovers the artwork's surprising connection to the Birger Sandzen Gallery in Lindsborg, Kansas. Clay gets a unique insider's look at the art of selling at auction with expert David Rago; appraiser Joyce Jonas demonstrates how to distinguish between natural and synthetic materials used in jewelry; and expert Chris Lane explains the complicated interplay of history, geography, age, and condition in determining the value of maps. Wrapping up the episode, Asian art expert Lark Mason relates the mystery of Chinese Emperor Qing's Summer Palace Fountain — a bronze masterpiece representing the animals of the Chinese zodiac. Disassembled and looted in 1860, its five still-missing heads could be almost anywhere — and could fetch a million dollars each.

Check local listings

Program 109 | Premiered Wednesday, Apr. 6, 2005

A thrilling tale of a WWII plane crash in an area between India and Burma was captured by ANTIQUES ROADSHOW cameras in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, during an appraisal of native artifacts brought in by the pilot's granddaughter. Years later, a series of wild coincidences enables ANTIQUES ROADSHOW FYI to update that story, complete with original newsreel footage of the pilot's rescue. Later, appraiser David Lackey opens his Houston, Texas, home for a special tour of his vast and eclectic collections; and Clay chats with expert Allan Katz about the hot market for American folk art trade signs. Appraiser Arlie Sulka caps the show with the story of an extreme makeover turned extreme mystery: A magnificent Tiffany screen commissioned for the White House in 1882 by Chester A. Arthur was dismantled — perhaps even destroyed — in 1904, at the behest of Teddy Roosevelt. A century later, rumors have surfaced that pieces of the screen may still exist.

Check local listings

Program 110 | Premiered Wednesday, Apr. 13, 2005

Find out if the $75,000 to $100,000 valuation of an original menu from the Titanic — discovered at the Houston, Texas, ROADSHOW in 1998 — held water, when ANTIQUES ROADSHOW FYI Correspondent Clay Reynolds talks to the owner about the document's sale. Also, ROADSHOW FYI's cameras capture the skyrocketing action as a rare, hand-painted eighteenth-century chest of drawers, found by Skinner appraisers Martha Hamilton and Stephen Fletcher during a routine house call in Massachusetts, fetches a record-setting $1,876,000. Clay visits antique appliance collector extraordinaire Stefan Osdene — first featured as a teenager on the 1998 special ANTIQUES ROADSHOW JR. with his burgeoning electric fan collection; and appraiser John Hays shares the tantalizing details of the priceless furniture collection once owned by American Revolutionary War hero General John Cadwalader, now dispersed and turning up piece by piece as far away as Italy.

Check local listings

Program 111 | Premiered Wednesday, Apr. 20, 2005

The owner of a rare, nineteenth-century block-printed Persian tapestry, brought to ANTIQUES ROADSHOW in Richmond, Virginia in 1998 and valued at $3,000 to $5,000, tells correspondent Clay Reynolds what the unusual textile inspired her to do. Fine arts conservator Steven Tatti shows Clay how the alchemy of science, craftsmanship and artistry can restore damaged works of art, and Clay gets a cook's tour of kitchen collectibles — including an unrivaled assortment of antique food molds — from respected authorities Marilyn and Sheila Brass. Finally, expert Noel Barrett invites viewers to join the hunt for the holy grail of mechanical banks: a rare 1873 cast iron model known as "The Old Woman in a Shoe." To date, only two complete examples are known to exist; one recently sold for $426,000!

Check local listings

Program 112 | Premiered Wednesday, May 4, 2005

It's Anatomy of an Appraisal when host Lara Spencer catches up with the owner of a Civil War era amputation set, appraised at the Boston ANTIQUES ROADSHOW event in 2001 for $2,000 to $2,500. In a haunted basement in Salem, Massachusetts, ROADSHOW FYI correspondent Clay Reynolds has a spirited conversation with Mark B. Ledenbach, one of the world's foremost collectors of antique and vintage Halloween decorations, and then Clay goes one step beyond at New York's Hotel Chelsea — reputed to host its share of noncorporeal guests — for a séance, complete with conjurer's equipment once owned by Harry Houdini. Fittingly, Edgar Allan Poe has the last word when expert Ken Gloss reveals that a copy of Poe's first book — actually a pamphlet-size work entitled Tamerlane — might still lie buried within an old box of books, waiting to bring a six-figure fortune to its rescuer.

Check local listings

Program 113 | Premiered Wednesday, May 11, 2005

Find out what having a baby has to do with a Tiffany lamp, appraised for $12,000 to $15,000 at the 1998 Richmond ANTIQUES ROADSHOW event. Then it's back to school when ANTIQUES ROADSHOW FYI correspondent Clay Reynolds attends Beth Szescila's class on "Appraisal Tips for the Savvy Collector" at Rice University and watches as students test their knowledge at an antiques mall. Clay also gets the scoop from expert Karen Augusta on smart shopping for vintage clothing, from 1950s poodle skirts to designer couture. From expert David Rago comes the fascinating tale of Biloxi's eccentric pottery genius George Ohr, whose 10,000-piece collection was bought by a collector some fifty years after Ohr's death — with the exception of some documented masterpieces, lost and promising to bring lump sums in the high six figures if found.

Check local listings

Program 114 | Premiered Wednesday, May 18, 2005

From plaster dust to price guides, Clay Reynolds tracks the trajectory of an owner who appeared at the 2002 Seattle ANTIQUES ROADSHOW event with a collection of vintage can labels found during demolition of a house and valued at $10,000 to $14,000. Expert Andy Ourant is our tour guide to the world of petroliana when ROADSHOW FYI visits the Hershey, Pennsylvania Car Show to find folks whose hearts race at the sight of vintage oil cans, gas pumps, and gas station signs. Appraiser Nancy Druckman introduces us to paper maché artist Jim Seffens who demonstrates how the ancient and accessible craft has remained largely unchanged over time. Finally, while the term "Eastlake" has become a catch-all to describe late Victorian furniture, only one piece has ever been found actually made to Charles Locke Eastlake's design specifications. Are other elusive pieces of Eastlake furniture hiding in plain sight?

Check local listings

Program 115 | Premiered Wednesday, May 25, 2005

There was nothing chintzy about the value of $6,000 to $8,000 placed on the set of Royal Winton Chintz dinnerware brought to the Charleston ANTIQUES ROADSHOW event in 2000. However, because the owner refused to break up the set, prospects for selling were slim — until the king of dinnerware made her an offer. If you think a "wet room" and a "dye room" are found at a beauty spa, you need to watch Colonial Williamsburg experts Linda Baumgarten and Loreen Finkelstein demonstrate how delicate textiles are restored, cleaned and conserved. Finally, a heartbreaking story involving a Houston art collector whose gift to his wife of a valuable painting by Mexican artist Rufino Tamayo was stolen from a storage facility. Years later, despite working with law enforcement authorities and posting a $10,000 reward, the collector's widow still has not recovered the painting.

Check local listings

Program 116 | Premiered Wednesday, June 1, 2005

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW FYI correspondent Clay Reynolds catches up with the owner of a certain pelican who recently made a lucrative migration from Savannah, Georgia to New York City. The pelican in question is a bronze Rembrandt Bugatti sculpture appraised in 2003 at the ANTIQUES ROADSHOW event in Savannah for $20,000 to $30,000 and sold at auction in New York. Later, Clay delves into the emotions that drive collectors when he visits with Nicholas Lowry of Swann Galleries, a longtime appraiser on ANTIQUES ROADSHOW and passionate collector of Czech posters. Then, ROADSHOW FYI joins expert Ken Farmer for a jaunt through Jugtown and the many other storied potteries of Seagrove, North Carolina. Finally, Clay and appraiser Colleene Fesko open up the cold case file of "The Chanting Cherubs," an early piece by famed American neoclassical sculptor, Horatio Greenough. Commissioned by James Fenimore Cooper, the marble masterpiece had a short public life, from 1831 to 1832, before it was reportedly sold — and then disappeared.

Check local listings

Program 117 | Premiered Wednesday, June 22, 2005

Frankly, Scarlett, ANTIQUES ROADSHOW FYI reveals the fate of a pre-production Gone With the Wind script appraised in Portland, Oregon in 1998 for $30,000 to $35,000. Even Santa would be impressed with Tin Toy Works of Allentown, Pennsylvania, the most respected antique tin toy repair business in the world, and expert Noel Barrett plays guide as we tour the workshop. Later, appraiser Stephen Fletcher offers proof that watching ANTIQUES ROADSHOW leads to discovering your own treasure. Fletcher relates the story of a man who saw a valuable George Washington mantel clock appraised on ROADSHOW, contacted Fletcher, and now stands to get $100,000 to $150,000 at auction for a Washington clock left behind in the 1950s by former owners of his house. Wrapping up the show, expert Francis Wahlgren tells a tale of lost luggage and a lost legacy: a valise filled with almost all of Ernest Hemingway's early short stories and poems was lost by his first wife, Hadley, during a trip to join Hemingway in Switzerland. The value of the missing manuscripts is almost incalculable — and may have cost Hadley her marriage.

Check local listings

Program 118 | Premiered Wednesday, June 29, 2005

War broke out — a bidding war, that is — when a rare Baltimore quilt, appraised on ANTIQUES ROADSHOW in 1996 for $10,000 to $15,000, came up for auction at Sotheby's. ROADSHOW FYI gets a blow-by-blow of the battle scene from the owner and the distinguished bidders: the Maryland Historical Society and Colonial Williamsburg. Then, ROADSHOW FYI correspondent Clay Reynolds checks in with a flock of migratory antiques dealers at the venerable Winter Antiques Show in New York to learn why dealers often travel to sell their wares. ROADSHOW FYI and appraiser Alasdair Nichol track down a horse lover who leaves her steeds in the stable, but gives her passion for equine collectibles — from paintings to porcelain to placemats — free reign in the house. Wrapping up, expert Simeon Lipman talks about a legendary missing piece of sports history: the winning home run baseball hit by the Giant's Bobby Thomson in the 1951 National League Pennant series against the Dodgers, immortalized as "The Shot Heard 'Round the World." Lipman speculates that ball, which disappeared into the lower stands at the Polo Grounds, never to be seen again, would be worth at least $1,000,000 if authenticated.

Check local listings

Program 119 | Premiered Wednesday, July 6, 2005

Correspondent Clay Reynolds finds out why an owner is struggling over what to do with an extremely rare circa 1818 Creek Indian sash appraised for $6,000 to $8,000 at ANTIQUES ROADSHOW in Savannah, Georgia. Later, sparks fly when Clay learns about the centuries-old lost-wax method of bronze sculpture casting at the Modern Art Foundry in Queens, New York. Then Clay and expert Gloria Lieberman have a heart-to-heart about love- and friendship-inspired jewelry designs. Finally, appraiser Dean Failey confides the story of the missing masterpiece that tugs at his heartstrings — a 250-year-old William Stoddard high chest, crafted in Oyster Bay, Long Island. Long misidentified as a Newport, Rhode Island high chest, after its true identity (and value of up to $100,000) was discovered, the piece mysteriously disappeared.

Check local listings

Program 120 | Premiered Wednesday, July 27, 2005

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW FYI correspondent Clay Reynolds discovers why a ship's passport signed by Thomas Jefferson — appraised on ANTIQUES ROADSHOW in Richmond, Virginia, for $4,000 to $5,000 — was the owner's passport to online adventure. Arms and militaria expert Bill Guthman invites Clay and the FYI audience to his home for a look at the extensive collection he's put together over the past 50 years. Moving along, ANTIQUES ROADSHOW FYI shows how to get a twentieth-century bicycle collection in gear. Clay wraps up the episode with appraiser David Lackey who describes the early twentieth-century proliferation of American regional artists, including Houston's Ruth Pershing Uhler, notorious for having burned a number of her paintings in the 1930s. Today, her remaining works are very desirable for collectors of Texas art and it's likely many are hanging, unnoticed in someone's back bedroom or forgotten in an attic.

Check local listings

Program 121 | Premiered Wednesday, July 27, 2005

The trail of a nineteenth-century southern basket, appraised at ANTIQUES ROADSHOW's Charleston, South Carolina event in 2000 for $4,000 to $6,000, leads ROADSHOW FYI correspondent Clay Reynolds to Colonial Williamsburg. Up North in Milton, Massachusetts, four experts conduct an unusual estate appraisal at the former home of an eclectic — and eccentric — collector. Next, folk art expert Allan Katz guides viewers through a collection of over 100 vintage tobacco store figures, including several variations on the traditional Indian. Then appraiser Andy Ourant talks to Clay about the pinnacle of durable and desirable toy collectibles — the one-of-a-kind Buddy L express truck and pedal car — which could bring a very serious $50,000 to $100,000 at auction.

Check local listings

Program 122 | Premiered Wednesday, August 3, 2005

FYI correspondent Clay Reynolds tracks down one of a trio of brothers to find out what they did with the rare collection of watercolors by their great-grandmother, Nora Brodie Hoare, after the artwork was appraised on ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, JR in 1998. It's lights, camera, action, antiques and collectibles at two very different Hollywood prop houses with expert Rudy Franchi, who makes a show-stopping discovery among the aisles of objects used in famous movies. Then, find out how 2004 stacked up when it came to breathtaking auction prices. What were some of the highest price tags in the world when the gavel came down on paintings, furniture, books, and sports memorabilia? "Why Not Take All of Me?" could be the theme song for J. Michael Flanigan's report on the puzzling phenomenon of valuable highboy chests that are missing their tops. The tops, which may be masquerading as small chests of drawers, could boost the value of the pieces from five figures to $1,000,000 and more.

Check local listings

Program 123 | Premiered Wednesday, August 17, 2005

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW FYI updates viewers on the fate of the G. Gaul painting appraised at the ROADSHOW Savannah, Georgia event for $15,000 to $25,000. Then, discover how conservators restore old paintings to their original glory when FYI correspondent Clay Reynolds pays a visit to painting restorer Judith Tartt. Along the Missouri River in Kansas City, FYI steps back in time to 1856 and the wreck of the steamboat Arabia, discovered by salvagers in 1987. Now the basis for a museum, the Arabia's cargo provides a well-preserved snapshot of mid-nineteenth-century life. Finally, FYI revisits one of the biggest art heists in recent memory, Boston's Gardner Museum theft of 1990, with interviews of museum staff and the FBI.

Check local listings

Program 124 | Premiered Wednesday, August 24, 2005

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW FYI correspondent Clay Reynolds hears how some early 1900s Fred Meyer photographs of Native American ceremonies — appraised at the Charleston, South Carolina, ANTIQUES ROADSHOW for $7,000 to $10,000 — began an authentic Wild West adventure for their owners. Next, Clay's adventures continue at "the Wild West of auctions" as he and expert J. Michael Flanigan brave the 40 acres of simultaneous auction action at Dixon's in Crumpton, Maryland. Then join expert Andy Ourant for a behind-the-scenes look at Vaillancourt Folk Art in Sutton, Massachusetts, which has pulled hundreds of vintage chocolate molds out of retirement to produce contemporary chalkware collectibles. Finally, appraiser Christopher Coover tells the tale of a missing — and dismembered — masterpiece: A 62-page draft of George Washington's first-term inaugural address, which, on the advice of his good friend James Madison, was never actually delivered. Many years later the manuscript found its way into the hands of a scholar and private collector who handed it out page-by-page to his friends. The scattered pages bear no mark to indicate Washington as the author and are likely languishing unrecognized in the dusty recesses of far-flung family libraries — worth as much as $350,000 each, if found.

Check local listings

Program 125 | Premiered Wednesday, August 31, 2005

Guests of ANTIQUES ROADSHOW don't always leave the convention hall with good news about their prized possessions. ANTIQUES ROADSHOW FYI correspondent Clay Reynolds catches up with one — whose pair of Federal knife boxes were identified as reproductions and appraised for $600 at the Richmond, Virginia, ROADSHOW — to hear how she handled the news. Later, expert Caroline Ashleigh tours actress Debbie Reynolds' $50 million movie memorabilia collection. Reynolds' son, Todd Fisher, plays tour guide, making stops at Marilyn Monroe's infamous white dress from The Seven Year Itch, Dorothy's ruby slippers from The Wizard of Oz, and other show-stopping cinema treasures. Turning back the clock to the late eighteenth century, FYI joins Ron Bourgeault at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, for a lesson in the American Fancy period of decorative folk art — and what pieces have collectors seeing stars today. Lastly, expert Richard Wright talks about the "googly-eyed" doll he's just ga-ga to find — a black version of the popular doll produced in the early 1930s by the German company Kammer & Reinhard — only ever seen in the company's original catalogue — and valued at as much as $20,000 to $30,000 each.

Check local listings

Program 126 | Premiered Wednesday, September 7, 2005

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW FYI correspondent Clay Reynolds discovers the owner of a Simon Halbig-made Joan of Arc doll — appraised for $1,500 at the San Diego, California, ANTIQUES ROADSHOW — was no martyr when it came to deciding what to do with it. Then, Matt Burstein of Burma Design in Cambridge, Massachusetts demonstrates the age-old furniture restoration methods he uses, with a stunning chestnut and mahogany desk as his model. Next, appraiser David Lackey offers hope to anyone who's ever lost or broken a piece of grandma's heirloom crystal as he introduces the crystal matching service where patterns and complimentary pieces are tracked down to make a collection — and maybe even a family — complete again. Wrapping up the episode is expert Chris Jussel's story of a very unique punch bowl, commissioned by Eleanor Roosevelt in celebration of her husband's successful reelection campaign for Governor of New York. Viktor Schreckengost's Jazz Bowl was so well liked that he produced several more for the Roosevelts and about 150 pieces for commercial distribution. 2006 marks Schreckengost's 100th birthday and a call to find the roughly 100 bowls not presently accounted for in museums and private collections — a treasure hunt worth a grand total of $25,000,000!

Check local listings


FYI Home | Shop AR | Subscribe to AR Fanfare | Contact Us | Send Us Your Update | Credits
Site Map | Your Privacy | WGBH Home


  © 2005 WGBH.

Antiques Roadshow FYI Antiques Roadshow Online