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the other drug war

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Pre-Viewing Lesson Plan
  • Media Messages
  • Student Handout: Key Concepts in Media Literacy
  • Student Handout: Prescription Drug Advertising

  • Viewing Lesson Plan
  • Student Viewing Guide
  • Student Handout: Questions for Viewing
  • Student Handout: Key Terms and Definitions

  • Post-Viewing Lesson Plans
  • The Rest of the Story
  • Great Debates

  • Supplementary Activities

    Internet Resources

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    » Post-Viewing Lesson Plan

    Great Debates

    » Lesson Objective:

    Students will develop critical thinking skills as they construct arguments for one of the three debates described in this lesson.

    » Time Needed:

    Two class periods (one class for development and one for the debates)

    » Materials Needed:

    » Procedure:

    1. Discuss the tactics of debate and presentation of evidence as they are used in political and legal forums. Explain the rules for debate.

    2. Depending on the size of your class, divide your class into two or three groups of approximately 8-10 students each.

    3. Assign or let each group choose one of the following topics:

      a. Which plan is more effective for helping consumers defeat high drug prices, Maine's or Oregon's?
      b. Should the U.S. government press for changes in Medicare?
      c. Would price controls hinder drug research and development?
      d. Should direct-to-consumer drug advertising and marketing be barred or controlled, or should it continue as it is?

    4. Divide each group in half, with one half of each group taking one side of their assigned debate, and the other half taking the remaining side. Give students time to research and prepare their debate information.

    5. Conduct the debates in class, allowing for class critiques following each debate.

    » Method of Assessment:

    Evaluate students' use of information in the debate and their participation.

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